Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My basic setup is that I have a form, which is hidden, until a selection is made via click, such as "member, nonmember, staff etc." Once the selection is clicked the form shows, with the the billing area inside also hidden, until the form total reaches greater than $0.

Now the problem I have is that, as soon as 4 of the 5 choices are clicked, the total should instantly be greater than $0. And that being so, the billing portion should trigger automatically, but I can't get my second function (the one that does the calculations) to listen to the first function for the onclick event or on change event. Is there a way that inside each of my "if" statements, and the end I put in code like "execute calculate function"?

Something like this:

if(section == 'Member') {
            var base_cost = 150;

            $("#commentTable,#ClinicStaff,#IMSNonMember,#Resident,#Student").fadeOut('slow', function() {
                // Animation complete.
            });
            $("#commentTable, #IMSMember").fadeIn('slow', function() {
                // Animation complete
            });
            $("input[name=SectionChosen]").val('Member');// Section selected, pass as hidden field for processing
                    ***$runNextFunction();***

        }

I tried doing: $(" 'input[name^=PROD]', 'base_cost ").change(function() {

to see if I can make the function watch for changes on both the input and the base cost field. But it doesn't want to trigger. Here is my full setup:

jQuery(function(ready){

    jQuery('.showForm').click(function(){

        var section = $(this).attr('target');
        var base_cost = ''; // reset base cost
        $("input[name=TOTAL]").val('');// Reset the Total field to 0 to hide the billing form again
        $("input[name^=PROD]").val('');// matches those that begin with 'PROD' and clears them
        $("input[name=SectionChosen]").val('');// Reset the section choice


        if(section == 'Member') {
            var base_cost = 150;

            $("#commentTable,#ClinicStaff,#IMSNonMember,#Resident,#Student").fadeOut('slow', function() {
                // Animation complete.
            });
            $("#commentTable, #IMSMember").fadeIn('slow', function() {
                // Animation complete
            });
            $("input[name=SectionChosen]").val('Member');// Section selected, pass as hidden field for processing

        }
        else if(section == 'Clinic') {
            var base_cost = 150;

            $("#commentTable,#IMSMember,#IMSNonMember,#Resident,#Student").fadeOut('slow', function() {
                // Animation complete.
            });
            $("#commentTable, #ClinicStaff").fadeIn('slow', function() {
                // Animation complete
            });
            $("input[name=SectionChosen]").val('Clinic');// Section selected, pass as hidden field for processing
        }
        else if(section == 'Nonmember') {
            var base_cost = 250;

            $("#commentTable,#IMSMember,#ClinicStaff,#Resident,#Student").fadeOut('slow', function() {
                // Animation complete.
            });
            $("#commentTable, #IMSNonMember").fadeIn('slow', function() {
                // Animation complete
            });
            $("input[name=SectionChosen]").val('Nonmember');// Section selected, pass as hidden field for processing
        }
        else if(section == 'Resident') {
            var base_cost = 75;

            $("#commentTable, #IMSMember,#ClinicStaff,#IMSNonMember,#Student").fadeOut('slow', function() {
                // Animation complete.
            });
            $("#commentTable, #Resident").fadeIn('slow', function() {
                // Animation complete
            });
            $("input[name=SectionChosen]").val('Resident');// Section selected, pass as hidden field for processing
        }
        else if(section == 'Student') {
            var base_cost = 0;

            $("#commentTable,#IMSMember,#ClinicStaff,#IMSNonMember,#Resident").fadeOut('slow', function() {
                // Animation complete.
            });
            $("#commentTable, #Student").fadeIn('slow', function() {
                // Animation complete
            });
            $("input[name=SectionChosen]").val('Student');// Section selected, pass as hidden field for processing
        }


        // Calculate order Total
        $('input[name^=PROD]').change(function() { 

            // Total cost of order, is equal to base cost + any additional selectoins made below
            var order_total = base_cost;

            // Run through all the form fields
            $('input[name^=PROD]').each(function(i) {

                // Get the current field and its name
                var form_name = $(this).attr('name');

                // If so, extract the price from the name
                var item_price = parseFloat(form_name.substring(form_name.lastIndexOf("_") + 1));

                // Get the quantity
                var item_quantity = parseInt($(this).val(), 10);

                // Update the order total
                if (item_quantity >= 0) {
                    order_total += item_quantity * item_price
                }

            });

            // Display the total rounded to two decimal places
            $('input[name=TOTAL]').val((Math.round(order_total*100)/100).toFixed(2));

            // Show the billing portion if total is not 0
            if (order_total > 1) {
                // show the section with the billing portion
                $("#BillingPortion").show();
            }
            else {
                // hide billing portion if total is 0
                $("#BillingPortion").hide();
            }
        });


    });
});

As you can see from the jsFiddle here the form works, if you click a selection, then add more "cost" by inserting a number into the guests, and THEN the billing portion shows. But that's not good enough, because if they don't want any guests, the billing portion should still show if they base cost is greater than $0.

If someone could point me in the right direction that would be great.

Also I'm quite inexperienced when it comes to jQuery, so I'm sure my code could be made more DRY and probably looks awful to some of you, but at least it's a start.

share|improve this question
    
You cannot use the target attribute of your anchor elements for custom data such as Member, Clinic and Student. Use a data-* attribute instead, such as data-section. –  Mattias Buelens Feb 11 '13 at 14:16
    
@Mattias Buelens, I'm not sure I understand. The var section = $(this).attr('target'); part just changes a hidden input field in the form, so that I can have the data when the submit is clicked and I'm processing it. Why is that wrong? –  Amir Feb 11 '13 at 14:27
    
The target attribute has a distinct meaning in HTML, it specifies in what frame the anchor link should open. You cannot assign any value you want to it, as that value has a specific semantic meaning and behaviour. –  Mattias Buelens Feb 11 '13 at 14:34
    
My link to execute the function looks like this: '<a class="showForm" target="Member" style="cursor: hand; cursor: pointer;">IMS Member Physician</a>' and it seems to work. So what should I change it to, to still have the functionality but no conflicts? –  Amir Feb 11 '13 at 14:43
    
See my answer below. You can replace those links with radio boxes and use a data-* attribute for your base costs. –  Mattias Buelens Feb 11 '13 at 15:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

All right, I went ahead and did a few refactorings on your code. Here's the result.

Markup of section links

You were using links to switch between forms. However, the links themselves indirectly (through your JavaScript code) set a hidden input called SectionChosen. You could make it more apparent that clicking a link represents a choice, and that choice is also part of the form data. Therefore, it is much more appropriate to use a set of radio boxes to pick one option, rather than set of semantically unrelated links. Since radio boxes are proper input elements with a name and a value, these can replace your original hidden SectionChosen input. Bonus: you don't even need any JavaScript to set the value, as the value of the selected radio box will be submitted!

<label><input type="radio" name="SectionChosen" value="Member" /> I am an IMS Member Physician</label>
<label><input type="radio" name="SectionChosen" value="Clinic" /> I am a Clinic/Hospital Administrators or Clinic Staff</label>
...

Retrieving the base cost

In the click handler, you were trying setting a local variable called base_cost depending on the clicked link to calculate the total. The problem is that you were binding new handlers to the input's change event, stacking upon previously bound handlers from previously chosen links. It looks like it's working, but really you're calculating a multitude of totals with only the last bound handler producing the final output value.

In reality, the base cost is a property of the chosen section and it should be readily accessible both when switching sections as when changing form inputs. A good way to do this is by storing the base cost of each choice as an attribute on the radio box. data-* attributes were introduced specifically for such custom data needs:

<input type="radio" name="SectionChosen" value="Member" data-base-cost="150" />

The base cost can then be retrieved with:

var base_cost = $(...).data('base-cost');

To get the base cost from the currently selected section, simply look for the currently selected radio box:

var base_cost = $('input[name=SectionChosen]:checked').data('base-cost');

That's all there is to it! You no longer need to bind the change handler from within the click handler, as you can find the base cost in the markup itself. This means you only need to bind the change handler once at DOM ready, as it should be.

Further improvements

There's always room for more improvement. For example, you could give the actual form sections a data-section attribute matching the section name instead of an id. This way, you can more easily select the sections which need to be hidden and those that need to be shown. Instead of writing down the same list of ID selectors, you can just select something like .section[data-section="Member"] and .section:not([data-section="Member"]). Heck, that data-section value can even come from the chosen radio box itself, you won't even need a long if...else if tree any more!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for doing this, however, it still doesn't work. When you click "member" or non member, any of base cost > $0, the form shows, but the billing portion does not show. Also the total cost is not set to "base-cost". The calculating function is still just tied to the change event of PROD input, so I think it still needs to also listen to the click event of the first function. What do you think? –  Amir Feb 11 '13 at 15:28
1  
@Amir Now that the calculation function is not tied to anything any longer, you can simply extract the function out of it, name it and call it when switching sections. I updated the fiddle. The original change handler is now named updateTotal and is called from within the section and inputs change handlers. –  Mattias Buelens Feb 11 '13 at 16:04
    
Dang I was trying to do exactly that. I figured that this was the solution, I just didn't know how to get there. I tried doing something like this '$.calculateTotal = $('input[name^=PROD]').change(function() {' and then calling '$.calculateTotal();' inside the section switch function. But I just realized even named, it was STILL tied to the change event! So that's why it wasn't firing, even when called by name form the previous function. Anyway, this has been very enlightening for me! Thank you very much for the help! –  Amir Feb 11 '13 at 16:14
    
@Amir You're welcome! Indeed, change doesn't return the bound function, instead it returns the jQuery object again for chaining. You need to actually take the function out of there and name it. –  Mattias Buelens Feb 11 '13 at 16:32

A couple of things. By having the $('input[name^=PROD]').change binding inside your click handler you are going to add the same handler every time you fire your click handler. This means on the second click, when you then change the input, it will fire twice. This is probably not what you wanted.

Second, why not just abstract out the part that calculates the total to a separate function that you can call in your click handler.

function calculateTotal() {
    // your code to calculate the total and make part of the UI visible if more than
    // $0.
}

Then you can also have your change handler call it:

 $('input[name^=PROD]').change(function() { 
     calculateTotal();
 }
share|improve this answer
    
If I pull the function out, how do I keep it so that it still listens to a change on the PROD input field? Because while a "click" will trigger "base cost", if it's a student base cost will be $0. But then if the student adds a guest, total would go up, but my calculateTotal is not listening to the onChange event. –  Amir Feb 11 '13 at 14:33
    
Just have the change handler call the same function. –  Matt Burland Feb 11 '13 at 15:11
    
This ended up being part of the solution. So thank you as well! –  Amir Feb 11 '13 at 16:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.