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Given the following class:

class x
{
    Object lockOne = new Object();
    Object lockTwo = new Object();

    List<Something> listOne = new List<Something>();
    List<Something> listTwo = new List<Something>();

    void MethodOne()
    {
        lock(lockOne)
        {
            // some operation on listOne
        }
    }

    void MethodTwo()
    {
        lock(lockTwo)
        {
            // some operation on listTwo
        }
    }
}

Is it correct to use two locking objects assuming that MethodOne() and MethodTwo() can be called from different threads concurrently noting that listOne and listTwo are not related in anyway. The only operations involved in the locks are those specified in the comments above.

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1  
It is called lock splitting and is a good way to reduce contention if the two objects & methods are independent. –  assylias Feb 11 '13 at 14:16
    
It should be called common sense, doing it the other way around is a very bad practice. –  Dariusz Feb 11 '13 at 14:50
    
One thing you may want to look in to is using a ReaderWriterLock. If you are only reading from the list it allows multiple threads to use it at once (List has thread safe reads), once you need to write you upgrade the lock and then only one thread can write and all the readers are blocked, afterward the multiple readers can start again. –  Scott Chamberlain Feb 11 '13 at 14:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, it is correct. It avoids needlessly locking one list just because the other list is being worked on.

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2  
Correct? Yes. Wasteful? Also yes, there is no need for the separate lock objects here. –  svick Feb 11 '13 at 14:58
2  
To clarify what svick said, he is not saying to lock on a single lock object but not to use any lock objects at all and lock on the list itself. –  Scott Chamberlain Feb 11 '13 at 15:08

There is no need for the separate lock objects here. The following code will work just as well, with less code, less overhead and less chance of mistakenly using incorrect lock:

class x
{
    List<Something> listOne = new List<Something>();
    List<Something> listTwo = new List<Something>();

    void MethodOne()
    {
        lock (listOne)
        {
            // some operation on listOne
        }
    }

    void MethodTwo()
    {
        lock (listTwo)
        {
            // some operation on listTwo
        }
    }
}
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7  
Just as a note, best practice (like this shows) is to only lock on items that are private to the class - otherwise you don't know what external code may attempt to lock on it when and cause deadlocks or race conditions. –  Jesse C. Slicer Feb 11 '13 at 15:56

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