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I am trying to build a VS .sln that has multiple C++ .vcproj's in it. The solution file is generated using CMake and I've got this part working in Jenkins (with the CMake builder plugin). To build the solution file, I am using msbuild. I am able to build the solution using both Visual Studio and from the command line with the following command:

C:\Jenkins\workspace\SonioTest>"C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\msbuild.exe" /t:Rebuild bin/SonIO.sln

This builds successfully (on the same machine that Jenkins resides).

However, I am trying to automate this portion of the build in Jenkins and the build ends up failing with a couple of C1083 errors ("Cannot open source file: '..\path\to\file.ext': No such file or directory). I have tried using both the Jenkins msbuild plugin and using the exact same command that works in the terminal as a "Execute Windows batch command" build step, with the same result.

When using the Windows batch command build step, I can see in the log that the command being executed:

C:\Jenkins\workspace\SonioTest>"C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319 msbuild.exe" /t:Rebuild bin/SonIO.sln

... is exactly the same as the one that works from the command line, including the working directory.

I am running Jenkins as a service and I have the service logon as my account (with administrator privileges). Anyone know what directory Jenkins will execute batch commands out of?

Any ideas why I'm seeing this difference of behavior between Jenkins and the command line?

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I think you have to specify the absolute path to your solution by using a placeholder like %WORKSPACE% –  Ufuk Hacıoğulları Feb 11 '13 at 14:42
    
I have verified that the command is being run by Jenkins from the same working directory. Does your comment still apply? I'm not 100% sure what you mean. –  Kohanz Feb 11 '13 at 15:00
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3 Answers

This is as much a workaround as a solution, but I ended up using devenv instead of msbuild and it works fine.

I know that this hints strongly as it being an environmental issue, but since it's not a problem to have VS installed on the build server, I decided to save the time that would be spent in the msbuild rabbit hole.

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Without knowing much about VS build, it looks mostly like an environment setup.

My first advice would be to make sure, in Jenkins, you change directory to the same directory you ran the good command from and try it then.

Also, might want to try running Jenkins as a standalone app first.

And as a service, maybe allow service to "interact with desktop".

I hope this is a good lead...

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I have verified that it is running from the same working directory as the successful non-Jenkins command (see my edit). The "Interact with desktop" checkbox is greyed out since I specify my own (administrator) user account. –  Kohanz Feb 11 '13 at 14:59
    
Have you tried running Jenkins as a process and not as a service? –  Eldad AK Feb 11 '13 at 19:50
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The environment being used by the account that the Jenkins slave agent is not the same environment as you use when doing the same command line from a prompt. Compare the two environments, note the difference, then add them to the Jenkins job.

To get the environment of the slave while running, have it do a "set" from a Windows Command Prompt

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I did this (before switching to devenv) and the Jenkins slave environment was almost (not completely) a superset of my command line environment. I examined closely the variables to do with compilation (VC...) and they were pretty much the same, with the Jenkins slave having some extra ones. I appreciate the help, but unless I have a compelling reason to switch from devenv.exe, I'd rather not sink more time into the investigation. –  Kohanz Feb 12 '13 at 14:53
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