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I have abstract class A which can serialize itself to and from byte[].

Another class C is parameterized with type T which should be or inherit from A and have parameterless constructor. C need to convert both ways between T and byte[].

Class C <T> where T : A, new() { ... }

The problem is: how to get T from byte[]?

I can't use some static method from A, because I can't override it. I can't call T(byte[]), because C# doesn't allow it.

The only way I found is to create instance of T and call some method overridden from A, i.e:

byte[] bytes; // some byte table
T someT = new T();
T.LoadFromBytes(bytes);

I would work, but in many cases I can only convert from bytes to new object of T. Is there any better solution or any way to do sth like:

public class SomeTClass : A
{
    public SomeTClass(){...}
    public void LoadFromBytes(byte[] bytes)
    {
        SomeTClass newT = Sth(bytes); /* new instance of SomeTClass
                                         is created from bytes */
        this = newT; /* can't do this, but I need to replace
                        current instance with the new one */
    }
}
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What type of serialization are you using? It's pretty important... –  James Feb 11 '13 at 15:09
    
Your second sentence is a bit confusing, C needs to be T but then you constrain is to A. –  Grant Thomas Feb 11 '13 at 15:10
    
Have you got a class factory with every type req'd having an instance in it? –  QuentinUK Feb 11 '13 at 15:11
    
So Sth is a class iheriting from SomeTClass? –  Aschratt Feb 11 '13 at 15:11
2  
@Ari well there is always the option of using reflection to map your properties across. Alternatively, if you don't mind using a 3rd party lib there is always tools like AutoMapper/ValueInjecter which were built for this particular purpose. –  James Feb 11 '13 at 15:51
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2 Answers

Take a look to the UpdateReference method and deserialization implementation. I think you should make your deserialization method as farbic method. It should takes byte[] as input parameter and return new instance of type you need. Is it what you want?

class C <T> where T : IA, new()
{
  public T Data { get; set; }
  .....

  public UpdateReference()
  {
    byte[] data = GetBytesFromSomewhere();
    Data = AImpl.Deserialize(data);

    Data.UserfulMethod();
    Data.AnotherUserfulMethod();

    data = GetBytesFromSomewhere();
    Data = AImpl.Deserialize(data)

    Data.UserfulMethod();
    Data.AnotherUserfulMethod();
  }
}

public interface IA
{
  public byte[] Serialize();
  public A Deserialize(byte[] data);

  public string UsefuleMethod1();
  public int AnotherUsefulMethod();
}

public class AImpl : IA
{
  public byte[] Serialize()
  {
    //Concrete implementation serialization
  }

  public static IA Deserialize(byte[] data)
  {
    //Concrete implementation deserialization
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In your code only AImpl is allowed to be used as IA. I mean, all classes derived from IA could have their own [de]serializer. –  Ari Feb 11 '13 at 15:25
    
How do you expecting your code should decided which class to deserialize from byte[]? for example, you have AImpl1, AImpl2 and AImpl3. You code only knows about byte[] - whose deserialization method should be called? –  Alex G.P. Feb 11 '13 at 15:29
    
You may prepend you byte[] with some kind of marker byte, convert interface to abstract class with fabric method. An this metho will analyse marker byte and calls corresponding deserializer. –  Alex G.P. Feb 11 '13 at 15:30
    
Instance of C has actual class as T and can use its methods derived from A. The problem is that it can't use static methods from T. If it could, problem would by easily solvable by static method in T getting byte[] and returning T (there is no problem to create such method) –  Ari Feb 11 '13 at 15:33
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I managed to solve this problem, but I don't like code I created.

The idea is to parameterized class A with T and create abstract method, which would be static, if it weren't be used from template type:

public abstract class A <T>
{
    public abstract byte[] Serialize();
    public abstract T Deserialize(byte[]); //should be static
}

Class C has new reguirement:

public class C <T> where T : A <T>
{
    someMethod(...)
    {
        ...
        byte[] bytes; // some bytes
        T = new T().Deserialize(bytes); // should be T.Deserialize(bytes)
        ...
    }
}

And some T implementation:

public class SomeTClass : A<SomeTClass>
{
    public SomeTClass Deserialize(byte[])
    {
        //deserialization code
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
If there is a better way, please provide. –  Ari Feb 11 '13 at 15:46
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