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Say I have two independent .cpp codes in two different directories: (please note that this is just a schematic of my question).

Here is the first one ... which can be successfully compiled in its own directory which has its own Makefile

// special libraries to include
#include "acado.h"  
#include "auxiliary_functions.c" 
/* -------------------------- */
// Create objects for special classes 
   ACADOvariables acadoVariables; 
   ACADOworkspace acadoWorkspace;

int main(){
    // perform task A_1
    // perform task A_2 
    // Tasks A_1 and A_2 depend on the specially included headers
    return 0;
}

And, here is the second one ... Again, this code can be successfully compiled in its own directory which has its own Makefile

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "Aria.h"
/* -------------------------- */
// Create objects for special classes 
  ArPose pose;
  ArRobot robot;

int main(){
    // perform task B_1
    // perform task B_2 
    // Tasks B_1 and B_2 depend on the specially included headers
    return 0;
}

Now, for my purposes, I need to have a source code like ...

// special libraries to include from both packages
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "Aria.h"
#include "acado.h"  
#include "auxiliary_functions.c" 
/* -------------------------- */
// Create objects for special classes from Part1
   ACADOvariables acadoVariables; 
   ACADOworkspace acadoWorkspace;
/* -------------------------- */
// Create objects for special classes from part2
  ArPose pose;
  ArRobot robot;
int main(){
    // perform task B_1
    // perform task A_1 (this task depends on values returned by B_1)
    // perform task B_2 (this task depends on values returned by A_1)
    // perform task A_2 (this task depends on values returned by B_1)
    return 0;
}

So, how can I use the two packages, and the two makefiles that I already have to compile this last piece of code ? ... I tried to put both packages contents (files and folders) into a single directory, with a makefile that contains both contents of the individual makefiles, but this was not successful to compile the third script...

Your help is really appreciated ...

share|improve this question
    
Generally, this sort of thing is done by leaving both software packages in their own directory, building the library or object files for each of the components, and then building your "main" component from those subcomponents. But without knowing the details of your two sets of source code, it's hard to be specific. –  Mats Petersson Feb 11 '13 at 15:14

2 Answers 2

In your current scenario, the first thing to check for is whether your makefiles are creating executables rather than simply object files. It seems like the latter if you're saying that the output from each makefile can be run on it's own. If the output is indeed an executable rather than an object file, you're not going to be able to "link" those executables together into a new executable. So what you want to make sure is that the output of the compilation process for each .cpp file is an object file with a .o extension, and that only a single .cpp file has a main() function. The process of creating object files rather than executables can be done using the -c option with g++.

Once you have object and/or library files created from each of the .cpp files, and a single .cpp file with a main() entry-point function, you can then link the object/library files together to create a final executable using g++ that will then include the functionality described in each of the individual .cpp files.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not possible to link executables to anything. It is only possible to link libraries and objects to create executables or shared libraries. –  Jan Hudec Feb 11 '13 at 15:19
    
Right, that's why I said it's not possible. He needs to output object files (and/or libraries), and then link those together, and make sure there is only a single file with a main() entry-point. –  Jason Feb 11 '13 at 15:19
    
Oh, yes, I somehow missed the .cpps each includes main() function. –  Jan Hudec Feb 12 '13 at 7:09

You compile each of the packages to a library. That's probably what the makefiles already do.

Edit: I somehow missed that both those files contain a main() function, clearly indicating they are each compiled into separate executable. Well, you'll have to factor the code you want to reuse out of them and either include it in your project or create libraries from it and link them in.


Old response about how to link library; much more will be needed here:

Than in your own package you pass the compiler flags:

  • -Ipath_to_the_headers for compilation stage, so the #include directives find the headers.
  • -Lpath_to_the_.a_files for link stage to tell the compiler where to look for the libraries
  • -llibname for link stage to tell the compiler which libraries to use

The last option is a little strange in that if the library is called libsomething.a, you write just -lsomething; on Windows with most compilers, but not gcc, the library would be called something.lib instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help;however,I am not that C++ expert, and I don't know where to put these compiler flags.(i.e. which file should I place the flags in). I also can't imagine the structure of directories.(i.e. I can't imagine where I should put the first package folder and the second package folder)... I also have to tell you that I am working on a UNIX platform (ubuntu) ... I can post the Makefiles of the individual packages if this will help ... thanks again and your help is really appreciated ... –  user2056096 Feb 11 '13 at 17:19
    
@user2056096: I somehow missed the files both contain main() function the first time around. That means you are in for some serious refactoring. There can only be one main() function, so you'll have to extract the bits you need from each project. And I'd suggest you look for a tutorial on how to write and compile C++ libraries; it's bigger scope than would fit in a SO question. –  Jan Hudec Feb 12 '13 at 7:20

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