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I need to parse a string into a Joda-Time DateTime (or java.util.Date.) This is an example of the string I'm getting:

eventDateStr = 2013-02-07T16:05:54-0800

The code I'm using:

DateTimeFormatter presentation = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("yyyy-MM-dd kk:mm:ssZ");
DateTime eveDate = presentation.parseDateTime(eventDateStr);

The above throws this exception:

Invalid format: "2013-02-07T16:05:54-0800" is malformed at "T04:03:20-0800"

So I'm parsing the 'T' out of there:

eventDateStr = eventDateStr.indexOf("T") > 0 ? eventDateStr.replace("T", " ") : eventDateStr;

and trying again. This time no exception but the time zone is off:

2013-02-08T02:05:54.000+02:00

Note the difference: in the original string the timezone is '-0800' and here it's '+02:00'. This in turn changes the entire date, which is now a day later.

What am I doing wrong?

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Do you notice that the date is also totally off? –  nhahtdh Feb 11 '13 at 15:21
    
Thanks for responding, nhahtdh. This produces an exception: java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Illegal pattern component: T –  Eddy Feb 11 '13 at 15:41
    
Did I notice that the date string is off? You mean this, 2013-01-27T04:03:20-0800? Yeah, but this is what I have to work with. –  Eddy Feb 11 '13 at 15:42
    
Yes, sorry, I didn't do the correct copy and paste. I edited the question so now they reflect what truly happens. A long story short, I think the day isn't really off, it's just pushed by the time zone issue by 10 hours forward, and in the example I'm bringing that pushes the date one day forward from the 7th to the 8th. –  Eddy Feb 11 '13 at 15:57
1  
Check my answer. I think it will solve your problem. –  nhahtdh Feb 11 '13 at 16:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Call the method withOffsetParsed on the DateTimeFormatter object to get a DateTimeFormatter that keeps the time zone parsed from the String, instead of offsetting it to the local time zone.

Regarding why T is shown when you print out the DateTime, Basil Bourque has a nice explanation in the comment below.

Regarding T, a DateTime is not a string nor does it contain a string. A DateTimeFormatter instance can generate a string representation of the date, time, and time zone information stored within a DateTime. When you invoke the toString method on a DateTime (either implicitly or explicitly), a built-in formatter based on ISO 8601 is used automatically. That formatter uses YYYY-MM-DDTHH:MM:SS.ssssss+00:00 format.

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Yes, that does it. Thanks! btw., I'm noticing that the 'T' is coming back after parsing. Why is that? Before Parsing, the string object: 2013-02-08T09:21:34-0800. After removing the 'T', the string object: 2013-02-08 09:21:34-0800. After parsing, the dateTime object: 2013-02-08T09:21:34.000-08:00 –  Eddy Feb 11 '13 at 16:34
    
@Eddy: No idea. Probably some sort of default notation(?). You probably need to use the formatter to output the date. –  nhahtdh Feb 11 '13 at 16:35
    
Regarding T, a DateTime is not a string nor does it contain a string. A DateTimeFormatter instance can generate a string representation of the date, time, and time zone information stored within a DateTime. When you invoke the toString method on a DateTime (either implicitly or explicitly), a built-in formatter based on ISO 8601 is used automatically. That formatter uses YYYY-MM-DDTHH:MM:SS.ssssss+00:00 format. –  Basil Bourque Feb 9 at 9:56

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