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I am trying to replace 13 with 21 using sed:

echo "for i in {1..5}; do commands for FILE13 > output_${i}; done" | sed 's/13/21/g'

And my output looks like this:

for i in {1..5}; do commands for FILE21 > output_2; done

13 was replaced with 21 but additionally ${i} was replaced with 2.

Why this happens? And how to stop sed replacing mu curly braces content?

Edit

What if my command looks like this:

echo 'for i in {1..5}; awk'{( do commands)}' FILE13  > output_${i}; done' | sed 's/13/21/g'

And I can't replace double quotes to single quotes as I am getting bash: syntax error near unexpected token('`

Is the only solution to use \ to escape braces?

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This sounds like an XY problem. Why are you editing a shell command? Do you just need an outer for loop that iterates over FILE13 and FILE21? If this is for use at an interactive shell, read up on your shell's history mechanisms. –  glenn jackman Feb 11 '13 at 17:40
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It isn't sed replacing the curly braces, it's the shell. Change the double quotes for the echoed string to single quotes.

Compare:

$ echo "for i in {1..5}; do commands for FILE13 > output_${i}; done"
for i in {1..5}; do commands for FILE13 > output_; done

$ echo 'for i in {1..5}; do commands for FILE13 > output_${i}; done'
for i in {1..5}; do commands for FILE13 > output_${i}; done

If the string you are echoing contains single quotes itself, then use double quotes and escape the $ or handle the quote directly:

$ echo "for i in {1..5}; awk'{( do commands)}' FILE13  > output_\${i}; done"
for i in {1..5}; awk'{( do commands)}' FILE13  > output_${i}; done

$ echo 'for i in {1..5}; awk'"'"'{( do commands)}'"'"' FILE13  > output_${i}; done'
for i in {1..5}; awk'{( do commands)}' FILE13  > output_${i}; done
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I edited my question with additional problem –  Pgibas Feb 11 '13 at 15:43
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Is the argument of echo a literal string? Then:

echo "for i in {1..5}; do commands for FILE13 > output_\${i}; done" | sed 's/13/21/g'
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You cannot embed single quotes in a single quoted string. Try:

echo 'for i in {1..5}; awk'"'"'{( do commands)}'"'"' FILE13  > output_${i}; done'
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