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I'm reading The Art of Assembly Programming by Randa Hyde (http://www.ic.unicamp.br/~pannain/mc404/aulas/pdfs/Art%20Of%20Intel%20x86%20Assembly.pdf) and I've reached the following statement in the book: "P4 The identity element with respect to • is one and + is zero. There is no identity element with respect to logical NOT." but I don't entirely understand what its saying. Can someone help me understand this sentence? English is my first language and I can normally read anything, but this is a bit confusing. I also know normal algebra, so most of this isn't new to me. I know what the additive and multiplicative identities are in plain ole' algebra.

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When you perform an operation (addition, multilpication) having an identity element as one of operands (0 for addition, 1 for multiplication) you get the second operand as the result

x + 0 = x
y * 1 = y

So for boolean algebra

x OR 0 <=> x

truth table
x | 0 | x or 0 | x OR 0 <=> x
1 | 0 |    1   |         1
0 | 0 |    0   |         1

y AND 1 <=> y

truth table
y | 1 | y and 1 | y and 1 <=> y
1 | 1 |    1    |          1
0 | 1 |    0    |          1

Boolean negation is unary operator (has only one operand) so it has no identity value, as it wouldn't make any sense.

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I need to know how that applies to boolean algebra, not normal algebra, sorry. –  Johanne Irish Feb 11 '13 at 16:21
    
It's the same really... truth and something gives something, false or something gives something –  Mchl Feb 11 '13 at 16:32
1  
The AND example should say y AND 1 <=> y, so it's a totally separate example :) –  Vladislav Zorov Feb 11 '13 at 19:25
    
Yeah. C/P error ;) –  Mchl Feb 12 '13 at 1:16
1  
Ok, I get it now thank you! –  Johanne Irish Feb 12 '13 at 3:33

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