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I'm writing a WinForms app that contains a simple object like this:

public class MyObject : INotifyPropertyChanged //  for two-way data binding
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private void RaisePropertyChanged([CallerMemberName] string caller = "")
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(caller));
        }
    }

    private int _IndexValue;
    public int IndexValue
    {
        get { return Value; }
        set
        {
            if (value != Value)
            {
                Value = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged();
            }
        }
    }

    private string _StringValue;
    public string StringValue
    {
        get { return _StringValue; }
        set
        {
            if (value != _StringValue)
            {
                _StringValue = value;
                _Modified = true;
                RaisePropertyChanged();
            }
        }
    }

    private bool _Modified;
    public bool Modified
    {
        get { return _Modified; }
        set
        {
            if (value != _Modified)
            {
                _Modified = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged();
            }
        }
    }

    public MyObject(int indexValue)
    {
        IndexValue = indexValue;
        StringValue = string.Empty;
        Modified = false;
    }
}

I have a BindingList that will contain a fixed number (100,000) of my objects as well as a BindingSource. Both of those are defined like this:

BindingList<MyObject> myListOfObjects = new BindingList<MyObject>();
BindingSource bindingSourceForObjects = new BindingSource();
bindingSourceForObjects .DataSource = myListOfObjects;

Finally, I have my DataGridView control. It has single column ("STRINGVALUECOLUMN") which displays the StringValue property for my objects and it is bound to the BindingSource that I just mentioned:

dataGridViewMyObjects.DataSource = bindingSourceForObjects;

When my application starts, I add 100,000 objects to myListOfObjects. Since I only have one column in my DGV and the property that it displays is initialized to string.Empty, I basically have a DGV that contains 100,000 "blank" rows. At this point, my user can begin editing the rows to enter strings. They don't have to edit them in any order so they might put one string in the first row, the next string in row 17, the next string in row 24581, etc. Sometimes, my users will want to import strings from text file. Since I have a fixed number of objects (100,000) and there may or may not be some existing strings already entered, I have a few checks to perform during the import process before I add a new string. In the code below, I've removed those checks but they don't seem to impact the performance of my application. However, if I import tens of thousands of strings using the code below, it's very slow (like 4 or 5 minutes to import 50k lines). I have narrowed it down to something in this block of code:

// this code is inside the loop that reads each line from a file...

// does this string already exist?
int count = myListOfObjects.Count(i => i.StringValue == stringFromFile);
if (count > 0)
{
    Debug.WriteLine("String already exists!"); // don't insert strings that already exist
}
else
{   
    // find the first object in myListOfObjects that has a .StringValue property == string.Empty and then update it with the string read from the file
    MyObject myObject = myListOfObjects.FirstOrDefault(i => i.StringValue == string.Empty);
    myObject.StringValue = stringFromFile;
}

It's my understanding that I need two-way binding so I can update the underlying data and have it reflect in the DGV control but I've also read that INotifyPropertyChanged can be slow sometimes. Has anyone ever run into this problem before? If so, how did you solve it?

-- UPDATE --

Just for testing purposes, I replaced:

// does this string already exist?
int count = myListOfObjects.Count(i => i.StringValue == stringFromFile);
if (count > 0)
{
    Debug.WriteLine("String already exists!"); // don't insert strings that already exist
}
else
{   
    // find the first object in myListOfObjects that has a .StringValue property == string.Empty and then update it with the string read from the file
    MyObject myObject = myListOfObjects.FirstOrDefault(i => i.StringValue == string.Empty);
    myObject.StringValue = stringFromFile;
}

with a for loop containing:

myListOfObjects[counter].StringValue = "some random string";

This is extremely fast even with 100,000 objects. However, I've now lost the ability to 1) check to see if the string that I read from the file is already assigned to an object in the list before I assign it and 2) find the first available object in the list whose StringValue property == string.Empty and then update that value accordingly. So it seems that:

int count = myListOfObjects.Count(i => i.StringValue == stringFromFile);

and

MyObject myObject = myListOfObjects.FirstOrDefault(i => i.StringValue == string.Empty);

...are the source of my performance problems. Is there a faster, more efficient way to perform these two operations against my BindingList?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure, but I don't think you need the INotifyPropertyChanged. I have always found that the Gridview and BindingSource did a "good-enought" job at keeping track for the objects. Have you tried removing the interface? –  Jens Kloster Feb 11 '13 at 16:23
    
@JensKloster removing INotifyPropertyChanged seems to result in changes to the underlying data not being reflected in my DataGridView. –  user685869 Feb 11 '13 at 16:41
1  
then you should properly not do that :). I have never had that problem i think. What changes the underlying datasource? –  Jens Kloster Feb 11 '13 at 16:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The thing about Linq is that its really just standard loops, optimized of course, but still regular old loops, back in the back code.

One thing that may speed your code up is this:

myListOfObjects.Any(i => i.StringValue.Equals(stringFromFile));

this returns a simple boolean, Does X exist. It early exits so it wont scan the entire collection if it doesn't have to. .Count() requires not only scanning the whole thing but also keeping a running count.

Another thing to point out, since you are using FirstOrDefault, that indicates that the result could be null. Make sure you have a null-check on myobject before trying to use it.

Finally, as suggested by Mr Saunders, check the event stack and make sure there isn't more code running than you think there is. This is a danger in operations like this. You might need to borrow some code from the initialization engine and use this.SuspendLayout() and this.ResumeLayout()

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the suggestions! –  user685869 Feb 11 '13 at 19:18

The problem may be that when you update the underlying data, events fire to cause the grid to update. Lots of data changing == lots of updates.

It's been a long time since I've done much with Windows Forms, but check out the SuspendLayout method.

share|improve this answer
    
oo, good point. Watch your event stacks, make sure the grid updates are disabled while importing data, dont want to be running repaints while doing something like that. –  Nevyn Feb 11 '13 at 19:04

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