Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using Hibernate+Spring+Jsf in my demo application i will want Spring will handel transaction management So i made these entries in application-context.xml file..

    <beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
            xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
            xmlns:tx="http://www.springframework.org/schema/tx"
            xmlns:context="http://www.springframework.org/schema/context"
            xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
                    http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-3.0.xsd
                    http://www.springframework.org/schema/tx 
                    http://www.springframework.org/schema/tx/spring-tx-3.0.xsd
                    http://www.springframework.org/schema/context 
                    http://www.springframework.org/schema/context/spring-context-3.0.xsd">

        <!-- Beans Declaration -->
        <bean id="User" class="com.otv.model.User"/>

        <!-- User Service Declaration -->
        <bean id="UserService" class="com.otv.user.service.UserService">
            <property name="userDAO" ref="UserDAO" />
        </bean>

        <!-- User DAO Declaration -->
        <bean id="UserDAO" class="com.otv.user.dao.UserDAO">
            <property name="sessionFactory" ref="SessionFactory" />
        </bean>

        <!-- Data Source Declaration -->
        <bean id="DataSource" class="com.mchange.v2.c3p0.ComboPooledDataSource" destroy-method="close">
            <property name="driverClass" value="org.postgresql.Driver" />   
            <property name="jdbcUrl" value="jdbc:postgresql://localhost:5432/postgres" />   
            <property name="user" value="postgres" />   
            <property name="password" value="hariom" /> 
            <property name="maxPoolSize" value="10" />
            <property name="maxStatements" value="0" />
            <property name="minPoolSize" value="5" /> 
        </bean>

        <!-- Session Factory Declaration -->
        <bean id="SessionFactory" class="org.springframework.orm.hibernate4.LocalSessionFactoryBean">
            <property name="dataSource" ref="DataSource" />
            <property name="annotatedClasses">
                <list>
                    <value>com.otv.model.User</value>
                </list>
            </property>
            <property name="hibernateProperties">
                <props>
                    <prop key="hibernate.dialect">org.hibernate.dialect.MySQLDialect</prop>
                    <prop key="hibernate.show_sql">true</prop>
<prop key="hibernate.connection.autocommit">false</prop>
                </props>
            </property>
        </bean>

        <!-- Enable the configuration of transactional behavior based on annotations -->
        <tx:annotation-driven transaction-manager="txManager"/>

        <!-- Transaction Manager is defined -->
        <bean id="txManager" class="org.springframework.orm.hibernate4.HibernateTransactionManager">
           <property name="sessionFactory" ref="SessionFactory"/>
        </bean>

    </beans>

And UserService.java class

package com.otv.user.service;

import java.util.List;

import org.springframework.transaction.annotation.Transactional;

import com.otv.model.User;
import com.otv.user.dao.IUserDAO;

/**
 * 
 * User Service
 * 
 * @author onlinetechvision.com
 * @since 25 Mar 2012
 * @version 1.0.0
 *
 */
@Transactional(readOnly = true)
public class UserService implements IUserService {

    // UserDAO is injected...
    IUserDAO userDAO;

    /**
     * Add User
     * 
     * @param  User user
     */
    @Transactional(readOnly = false)
    public void addUser(User user) {
        getUserDAO().addUser(user);
    }

    /**
     * Delete User
     * 
     * @param  User user
     */
    @Transactional(readOnly = false)
    public void deleteUser(User user) {
        getUserDAO().deleteUser(user);
    }

    /**
     * Update User
     * 
     * @param  User user
     */
    @Transactional(readOnly = false)
    public void updateUser(User user) {
        getUserDAO().updateUser(user);
    }

    /**
     * Get User
     * 
     * @param  int User Id
     */
    public User getUserById(int id) {
        return getUserDAO().getUserById(id);
    }

    /**
     * Get User List
     * 
     */
    public List<User> getUsers() {  
        return getUserDAO().getUsers();
    }

    /**
     * Get User DAO
     * 
     * @return IUserDAO - User DAO
     */
    public IUserDAO getUserDAO() {
        return userDAO;
    }

    /**
     * Set User DAO
     * 
     * @param IUserDAO - User DAO
     */
    public void setUserDAO(IUserDAO userDAO) {
        this.userDAO = userDAO;
    }

}

Now i my bean i am doing

@ManagedProperty(value="#{UserService}")
    IUserService userService;

     */
    public IUserService getUserService() {
        return userService;
    }

    /**
     * Set User Service
     * 
     * @param IUserService - User Service
     */
    public void setUserService(IUserService userService) {
        this.userService = userService;
    }

    public String addUser() {
        try {
            User user = new User();
            user.setId(getId());
            user.setName(getName());
            user.setSurname(getSurname());
            userService = getUserService();
            userService.addUser(user);
            userService.deleteUser(null);
            return SUCCESS;
        } catch (DataAccessException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }   

        return ERROR;
    }

Here in this code userService.deleteUser(null); I am forcefully throughing exception but still data saved in database ? Why not Trasaction management handle this situation if exception coming why it is not rollback the data?

UserDAO Class

package com.otv.user.dao;

import java.util.List;

import com.otv.model.User;

import org.hibernate.SessionFactory;


public class UserDAO implements IUserDAO {

    private SessionFactory sessionFactory;

    /**
     * Get Hibernate Session Factory
     * 
     * @return SessionFactory - Hibernate Session Factory
     */
    public SessionFactory getSessionFactory() {
        return sessionFactory;
    }

    /**
     * Set Hibernate Session Factory
     * 
     * @param SessionFactory - Hibernate Session Factory
     */
    public void setSessionFactory(SessionFactory sessionFactory) {
        this.sessionFactory = sessionFactory;
    }

    /**
     * Add User
     * 
     * @param  User user
     */
    public void addUser(User user) {
        getSessionFactory().getCurrentSession().save(user);
    }

    /**
     * Delete User
     * 
     * @param  User user
     */
    public void deleteUser(User user) {
        getSessionFactory().getCurrentSession().delete(user);
    }

    /**
     * Update User
     * 
     * @param  User user
     */
    public void updateUser(User user) {
        getSessionFactory().getCurrentSession().update(user);
    }

    /**
     * Get User
     * 
     * @param  int User Id
     * @return User 
     */
    public User getUserById(int id) {
        List list = getSessionFactory().getCurrentSession()
                                            .createQuery("from User where id=?")
                                            .setParameter(0, id).list();
        return (User)list.get(0);
    }

    /**
     * Get User List
     * 
     * @return List - User list
     */
    public List<User> getUsers() {
        List list = getSessionFactory().getCurrentSession().createQuery("from User").list();
        return list;
    }

}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

It seems the transaction boundaries are each method on the UserService class. When you say userService.addUser(user) that's one transaction started and finished. Hence when you say userService.deleteUser(null) it's another transaction -- and although it fails, the previous one is not rolled back because it's already comitted.

If you want to do everything in one single transaction, annotate your addUser() with @Transactional (or enclose in programmatic transaction)

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean programmatic transaction? –  subodh Feb 12 '13 at 4:47
    
And adduser already have @Transactional(readOnly = false) –  subodh Feb 12 '13 at 4:55
    
Declarative transaction boundary is when you annotate your method with @Transactional. Programmatic transaction boundary is when you call something like session.beginTransaction(). I was referring to public String addUser() on your last code snippet which does not have @Transactional annotation –  gerrytan Feb 12 '13 at 5:19
    
yes i removed and added at class level only but now even i am not forcefully throwhing exception but now data is not saved in DB –  subodh Feb 12 '13 at 5:25
    
What persistence technology are you using. If you're using JPA/Hibernate make sure you flush at the end so the changes are propagated. –  gerrytan Feb 12 '13 at 5:32

The @Transactional annotation on the method defines the boundary of the transaction (unless someone else already has an "outer Transaction" running). In the same way the @Transactional annotation of the class makes all single calls to (public) methods of instances of that class transactional, but does not make consecutive methods calls to the same instance being wrapped up in a single transaction. Instead every single method call runs in its own transaction and the transaction is committed if the method returns normally. (By default it even gets committed if a checked Exception is thrown though you can change this with the rollbackFor and noRollbackFor parameters.)

So in your case you have two transactions; one for this call:

userService.addUser(user);

which successfully creates a user and is committed when the call to addUser is finished, and a second one:

userService.deleteUser(null);

which is rolled back when the NullPointerException raises out of the method call. (I guess you get an NPE here, and as this is a subclass of RuntimeExcepotion, it causes a rollback.)

If you want to have both statements in a single transaction you need to have the transaction on a higher level. The '@Transactional` annotations here will not hurt, but they do not what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
I have already define @Transactional in Class level –  subodh Feb 12 '13 at 5:12
    
@Transactional is only a shorthand to make all public methods of that class transactional. It dies not make "the whole class" transactional. –  Clemens Klein-Robbenhaar Feb 12 '13 at 10:52
    
Can you please let me know how can we use trasaction management so that if exception comes its roolback the data –  subodh Feb 12 '13 at 11:13
    
Well, for example in your case you could mark the addUser() method on the class containing the IUserService userService as @Transactional and then that should roll back the transaction when the exception propagates outside the addUser() method - assuming that it got called form another class when it got injected via spring as an interface. Do not catch DataAccessException on the addUser() class but the one calling it, however. –  Clemens Klein-Robbenhaar Feb 12 '13 at 20:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.