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I have an extension method to subscribe a PropertyChanged event of an object that implements INotifyPropertyChanged.

I would like that the event fires just once. Not more.

This is my method.

public static void OnPropertyChanged<T>(this  INotifyPropertyChanged target, string    propertyName, Action action)
{
    if (target == null)
    {
        return;
    }

    PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = (obj, e) =>
    {

        if (propertyName == e.PropertyName)
        {
            action();
        }

    };


    target.PropertyChanged -= handler;
    target.PropertyChanged += handler;

}

But it does not work. I cannnot remove the event handler so the event fires every time I call this method.

I have try a different approach. Instead of using annonymous methods, something more traditional, like this:

public static void OnPropertyChanged<T>(this  INotifyPropertyChanged target, string    propertyName, Action action)
{
    if (target == null)
    {
        return;
    }

    target.PropertyChanged -= target_PropertyChanged;
    target.PropertyChanged += target_PropertyChanged;

}

static void target_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        //do stuff here
    }

And it just works fine. The event fires just once, but I also need the Action parameter. I cannot use it with this approach.

Any workaround or different aproach to solve this issue?Is there something strange with anonymous methods inside static methods?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That is a limitation of using anonymous methods as event handlers. They cannot be removed as you would a normal method (which is technically a delegate instance automatically create via a method group conversion) because anonymous methods get compiled into a compiler-generated container class and a new instance of the class is created each time.

In order to preserve the action parameter you could create a container class which would have the delegate for your event handler inside. The class can be declared private inside the of the other class you're working with - or made internal, maybe in a "Helpers" namespace. It would look something like this:

class DelegateContainer
{
    public DelegateContainer(Action theAction, string propName)
    {
         TheAction = theAction;
         PopertyName = propName;
    }

    public Action TheAction { get; private set; }
    public string PropertyName { get; private set; }

    public void PropertyChangedHandler(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if(PropertyName == e.PropertyName)
            TheAction();
    }
}

Then, create and store the reference to the container in your class. You might create a static member currentContainer and then set the handler like this:

private static DelegateContainer currentContainer;

public static void OnPropertyChanged<T>(this  INotifyPropertyChanged target, string    propertyName, Action action)
{
   if (target == null)
   {
       return;
   }

   if(currentContainer != null)         
       target.PropertyChanged -= currentContainer.PropertyChangedHandler;

   currentContainer = new DelegateContainer(action, propertyName);
   target.PropertyChanged += currentContainer.PropertyChangedHandler;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the idea of a container class, but I think this is unnecessarily complicated: a Dictionary<string, PropertyChangedEventHandler> can hold one delegate per property name. (Yes, that's a different kind of container class.) –  hvd Feb 11 '13 at 17:11
    
Yeah, I just wanted to present a generic solution. What I was implicitly trying to convey is that anonymous methods with closure generate a container class behind the scenes which contains references to the captured variables. So essentially it's the same type of behavior but you'd be making explicit.. –  Miky Dinescu Feb 11 '13 at 17:30
    
Thanks a lot. It works!!! The PropertyChangedEventHandler just fires once. –  Nadya Feb 12 '13 at 9:07
    
You're welcome! –  Miky Dinescu Feb 12 '13 at 15:54
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You can get your first example to work if you unsubscribe from within the event handler itself.

public static void OnPropertyChanged<T>(this  INotifyPropertyChanged target, string    propertyName, Action action)
{
    if (target == null)
    {
        return;
    }

    // Declare the handler first, in order to create
    // a concrete reference that you can use from within
    // the delegate
    PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = null;  
    handler = (obj, e) =>
    {
        if (propertyName == e.PropertyName)
        {
            obj.PropertyChanged -= handler; //un-register yourself
            action();
        }

    };
    target.PropertyChanged += handler;
}

The above code serves as a "one and done" event handler. You can register an unlimited number of these, and each one will only be executed once before unregistering itself.

Keep in mind that it's possible to have one of these handlers execute multiple times, if you raise the event across multiple threads in short succession. To prevent this, you might need to create a static Dictionary(T,T) mapping object instances to "lock objects," and add some sentry code to ensure that a handler is only executed once. Those implementation specifics seem to be a bit outside the scope of your question as currently written, however.

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This is different behavior. This is only letting it be fired once, whereas the OP's code was attempting to ensure there is only ever one handler (but it can be fired multiple times). –  Servy Feb 11 '13 at 16:54
1  
Oh, and note that if this event is fired from multiple threads in a short interval of time it's possible for it to run multiple times. –  Servy Feb 11 '13 at 16:56
    
All good points. A static Dictionary of objects->handlers may be required, to limit each instance of an object to a single event handler. –  BTownTKD Feb 11 '13 at 16:57
    
If PropertyChanged is firing from multiple threads you have bigger problems. –  Yaur Feb 11 '13 at 16:57
1  
Re-reading the original question, it still sounds like what the OP wants is a "one and done" event handler which unsubscribes itself. A static Dictionary mapping object instances to "lock objects" may be required, to ensure that a handler is only executed once across multiple threads, along with some "sentry" code to check if the handler has already been executed. –  BTownTKD Feb 11 '13 at 17:03
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Technically, it's not the same anonymous method you are trying to unsubscribe. .NET creates new instance of that method every time your OnPropertyChanged called. That's why unsubscription will not work.

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It's not necessarily just technically a different method. If different string instances of the same propertyName happen to get used for whatever reason, it has to be a different method. –  hvd Feb 11 '13 at 17:08
    
@hvd good point –  Anri Feb 11 '13 at 18:15
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