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I have searched, and searched (for 4 days) before posting this. I apologize in advance if it is too elementary, and a waste of your time. I have successfully generated some basic plots using pyplot, and matplotlib by using their tutorial's examples, but to no avail for what I need to accomplish.

Essentially:

  • I have a list of numbers that exist in a single file.
  • Each line contains a number corresponding to the number of milliseconds that it takes to complete a certain repeated task.
  • There are over a million entries in this file, and it can grow beyond that.

Example of 20:

173
1685
1152
253
1623
390
84
40
319
86
54
991
1012
721
3074
4227
4927
181
4856
1415

Eventually what I'll need to do is calculate a range of individual totals (distributed evenly over the absolute total number of entries) -- and then plot those averages using any of the plotting libs for python. I have considered using pyplot for ease of use.

  • The X axis will correspond to the total number of tasks completed, as the Y axis will represent the number of milliseconds it takes to complete the task (for this example the average time it takes to complete every 5).

ie:

Entries 1-5 = (plottedTotalA)
Entries 6-10 = (plottedTotalB)
Entries 11-15 = (plottedTotalC)
Entries 16-20 = (plottedTotalD)

From what I can tell, I don't need to indefinitely store the values of the variables, only pass them as they are processed (in order) to the plotter. I have tried the following example to sum a range of 5 entries from the above list of 20 (which works), but I don't know how to dynamically pass the 5 at a time until completion, all the while retaining the calculated averages which will ultimately be passed to pyplot.

ex:

Python 2.7.3 (default, Jul 24 2012, 10:05:38) 
[GCC 4.7.0 20120507 (Red Hat 4.7.0-5)] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> plottedTotalA = ['173', '1685', '1152', '253', '1623']
>>> sum(float(t) for t in plottedTotalA)
4886.0
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2 Answers 2

Let's assume you have your n values in a list called x. Then reshape x into an array A with 5 columns and calculate the mean for each line. Then you can simply plot the resulting vector.

x=np.array(x)
n=x.size
A=x.reshape(5,n/5)
y=A.mean(axis=0)
plot(y)

However, you might run into memory problems if you actually have over a million entries. You could also use the name x instead of A and y. This way you would overwrite the initial data and save some memory.

I hope this helps

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3  
This will blow up if len(x) % 5 != 0. I would use A = x[:(n // 5) * 5].reshape(5, -1) –  tcaswell Feb 11 '13 at 17:59
    
@user Thank you for your suggestions. I appreciate the quick response. I was able to plot using your methods. I'm now trying to figure out how to use what you have provided, and what sotapme gave me to plot the averages. Thanks again! –  TheDudeAbides Feb 11 '13 at 19:09
    
@tcaswell Thank you for your insight. I implemented your suggestion. –  TheDudeAbides Feb 11 '13 at 19:09

I've taken the problem to be how to get 5 items from a list that's generated from a file. As you said:

I don't know how to dynamically pass the 5 at a time until completion,

I've used /dev/random as it's never ending and random and simulates your big file and shows processing a big file without reading into a list or similar slurping of data.

################################################################################
def bigfile():
    """Never ending list of random numbers"""
    import struct
    with open('/dev/random') as f:
        while True:
            yield  struct.unpack("H",f.read(2))[0]
################################################################################
def avg(l):
    """Noddy version"""
    return sum(l)/len(l)
################################################################################

bigfile_i = bigfile()

import itertools
## Grouper recipe @ itertools
by_5  = itertools.imap(None, *[iter(bigfile_i)]*5)

# Only take 5, 10 times.
for x in range(10):
    l = by_5.next()
    a = avg(l)
    print l, a ## PLOT ?

EDIT

Detail of what happens to the remainder.

If we pretend the file has a 11 lines and we take 5 each time:

In [591]: list(itertools.izip_longest(*[iter(range(11))]*5))
Out[591]: [(0, 1, 2, 3, 4), (5, 6, 7, 8, 9), (10, None, None, None, None)]

In [592]: list(itertools.imap(None, *[iter(range(11))]*5))
Out[592]: [(0, 1, 2, 3, 4), (5, 6, 7, 8, 9)]

In [593]: list(itertools.izip(*[iter(range(11))]*5))
Out[593]: [(0, 1, 2, 3, 4), (5, 6, 7, 8, 9)]

In one case izip_longest will fill the remainder with None whereas imap and izip wil truncate. I can imagine the OP will want to perhaps use itertools.izip_longest(*iterables[,fillvalue]) for the optional fill value, although None is a good sentinel for No Values.

I hope that makes it clear what happens to the remainder.

share|improve this answer
    
A big thank you for your help; I have implemented your idea, and can now see the averages of 5 at a time pulling directly from my file. BUT -- what if I don't know the range. For instance, I want to take 100 at a time, until the end of the file. (could be 500k, 1 million, or just a few thousand. It's always variable.) Would the remainder be rounded off using something like a mod by? Could I strip the non 100 end piece, or divide by 100 to get the exact metric? –  TheDudeAbides Feb 11 '13 at 20:35
    
added details to answer. –  sotapme Feb 12 '13 at 1:34

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