Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a viewModel that contains the following:

public class CreateCardViewModel
    {
        [HiddenInput(DisplayValue = false)]
        public int SetId { get; set; }

        [Required]
        public IList<Side> Sides { get; set; }

        [Required]
        public int Stage { get; set; }

        [Required]
        [DataType(DataType.Date)]
        [HiddenInput(DisplayValue = false)]
        public DateTime DateCreated { get; set; }

        [Required]
        public bool IsReady { get; set; }

    }

The model is as follows:

public class Card
    {

        public virtual int CardId { get; set; }

        // belongs to a Set
        public virtual int SetId { get; set; }
        public virtual Set Set { get; set; }

        // has Sides
        public virtual IList<Side> Sides { get; set; }

        // is in a certain Stage
        public virtual int Stage { get; set; }

        // is ready to study
        public virtual bool IsReady { get; set; }

        public virtual DateTime DateCreated { get; set; }

    }

How can I set a default value for DateCreated?

Would the method change if I want to insert a blank Side into Sides upon Card creation?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could set defaults in the constructor:

public CreateCardViewModel()
{
    DateCreated = DateTime.Now;
    Sides = new List<Side> { new Side() };
}

Caveat: There is an issue with using DateTime.Now from a unit testing perspective. If you're unit testing your ViewModel creation and need to be able to verify that the created date is set to a known value, you can look at creating a separate concept for time, as detailed in Ayende's blog. You basically create a static func, SystemTime, that you can set to a known value in your tests. If you don't set it, it defaults to DateTime.Now:

public static class SystemTime
{
    public static Func<DateTime> Now = () => DateTime.Now;
}

Your constructor code then becomes:

public CreateCardViewModel()
{
    DateCreated = SystemTime.Now();
    Sides = new List<Side> { new Side() };
}

If you need to actually set the time to a known value, you do this:

SystemTime.Now = () => new DateTime(2013, 2, 11, 17, 41, 12);
share|improve this answer

I agree on The SystemTime approach.

Although, I personally don't like setting the CreatedDate on the constructor, since there can be a short time lapse since you instantiate the object and when you persist it to the database. (And here I am assuming you definitely are)

You could make all your domain objects inherit from an interface like this one:

public interface ITimeStamped
{
    DateTime DateCreated { get; set; }
}

And then on the Commit method int the Context class I would do something like this to set the date for all entities that implement the interface:

foreach (var entry in ChangeTracker.Entries<ITimeStamped>()
                .Where(entry => entry.State == EntityState.Added))
            {
                entry.Entity.DateCreated = SystemTime.Now();
            }

This way you're totally certain that the entity is stored with the correct DateTime when it was persisted on the database.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.