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I have a C++ class that I want to use in C#. For doing so I am trying to write an other C++ dll to wrap this class (which is part of an other library) with invokable functions (using "extern C and __declspec(dllexport)"). My idea is to keep a pointer to my object and send it to functions in wrapper dll and then call methods of that object from there. This seems fine but problems happen when object has deconstructor.

Here is my C++ wrapper code: (Device is my C++ class/object)

__declspec(dllexport) Status Device_open(Device* di, const char* uri)
{
     Device dl;
     Status status = dl.open(uri);
     di = &dl;
     return status;
}
__declspec(dllexport) void Device_Close(Device* di)
{
     di->close();
}

Here is my C# wrapper code:

    [DllImport("Wrapper.dll")]
    static extern Status Device_open(ref IntPtr objectHandler, IntPtr uri);
    public static Device Open(string uri)
    {
        IntPtr handle = IntPtr.Zero;
        Device_open(ref handle, Marshal.StringToHGlobalAnsi(uri));
        return new Device(handle);
    }
    [DllImport("Wrapper.dll")]
    static extern void Device_Close(IntPtr objectHandler);
    public void Close()
    {
        Device_Close(this.Handle);
    }

Here is testing code in C# application:

    Device d = Device.Open(di.URI);
    d.Close();

Every thing is good. Problem is here that when I request opening a new device, Deconstructor of main C++ object will be executed so my close request always return exception (becouse it is already closed or destructed);

What can I do to prevent this?!

share|improve this question
2  
Just FYI, there are no deconstructors in C++. They are called destructors. :) –  jalf Feb 11 '13 at 17:13
    
@jalf, Thanks for tip. +1 –  Soroush Falahati Feb 11 '13 at 18:39
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The Device is being destructed as it is out of scope at the endof the Device_open() function. To resolve, dynamically allocate the Device instance using new, this gives control of the lifetime of dl to you. Then delete dl; in the Device_Close() function.

Note that the C++ function is assigning the address to a Device* that is local to the function, it will not be seen by the caller. To fix this, on the C++ side, you can pass the pointer by reference:

__declspec(dllexport) Status Device_open(Device*& di, const char* uri)

or you can pass a Device**.

__declspec(dllexport) Status Device_open(Device** di, const char* uri)

I am, however, unsure how this would affect the c# side.

To prevent any memory leaks ensure that the new instance of Device is deleted if the call to dl.open(url) fails:

__declspec(dllexport) Status Device_open(Device*& di, const char* uri)
{
    Status status;
    try
    {
        Device* dl = new Device();
        status = dl->open(uri);
        if (status != OK)
        {
            delete dl;
        }
        else
        {
            di = dl;
        }
    }
    catch (std::bad_alloc const&)
    {
        status = BAD_ALLOC; // Or equivalent failure reason.
    }
    return status;
}

__declspec(dllexport) void Device_Close(Device* di)
{
     // di->close(); Uncomment if destructor does not close().
     delete di;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Tested and it solved my problem. Using Device*& don't need any change to my C# code. But what if it was an INT value or Void*?! What can I do for them?! I cant create new from them so what? –  Soroush Falahati Feb 11 '13 at 22:54
    
Forgot Thanks, :) And what if this object (lets say Device) come from an other method?! –  Soroush Falahati Feb 12 '13 at 0:31
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