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catch(Exception ex)

//code being sent to database table to log is -

ex.ToString()

The parameters are not being sent.

private int GetAge (int ID)
{

}

private string GetName (int ID)
{

}

How do i write in a generic way so that all the methods can have parameters concatenated with exception(ex.ToString)? Is there any generic approach(for winforms)?

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marked as duplicate by Steven Doggart, Gert Arnold, Michael Edenfield, Alastair Pitts, iMat Feb 11 '13 at 23:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6  
What parameters aren't being sent to what? –  Steven Doggart Feb 11 '13 at 17:30
    
I want to catch the parameters the methods are consuming(for ex:ID), i can go and write inside each method to concatenate parameter to ex.ToString(), but it will be too many methods, is there any generic way? –  Sharpeye500 Feb 11 '13 at 17:32
    
You want to log which ones are "missing", or you want to log the name/value pairs of all of the method parameters? –  Steven Doggart Feb 11 '13 at 17:33
1  
In general, you should not be catching exceptions that you can't appropriately handle. Additionally you really don't want to concatenate an exception to parameters. You should allow exceptions to bubble up and fix the underlying cause. –  Ryan Gates Feb 11 '13 at 17:38
1  
-1. Please use "Edit" button and add sample with method that does throw new Exception(), try/catch and have comment where do you want to log something. –  Alexei Levenkov Feb 11 '13 at 17:41

2 Answers 2

This is what's being logged:

ex.ToString()

presumably because that's all you're logging. Something like this, I assume, is the logging statement?:

catch (Exception ex)
{
    Logger.Log(ex.ToString());
}

The way to add more information to what's being logged is to pass it to the logger. Something like this:

catch (Exception ex)
{
    Logger.Log(string.Format("Failed to get a Name for the ID: {0} - Exception was: {1}", ID, ex.ToString()));
}

This is assuming you're logging only strings. You can perhaps expand this to include more strongly-typed data perhaps with custom exceptions being passed directly to the logger itself. It's hard to say without knowing more about the capabilities of the logger. Maybe a custom exception with a generic type parameter which internally adds the parameter to its string representation? Again, it's hard to say in this one simple example without more information.

As for making the whole thing generic, that's really up to your own designs. In the two method signatures you provide there is only one parameter. So a single generic property on a custom exception would work for that. What about methods with multiple parameters? What about methods with context above and beyond its own parameters? (Instance properties on the method's class, for example.)

Each exception is potentially vastly different. Each code block is its own piece of logic in the domain. And providing meaningful context with errors (which is an excellent thing to do, by the way) is often very subjective to those differences in the logic for those code blocks. Sometimes it's strongly typed information, sometimes it's human-readable context about the situation, etc.

Working with legacy code, a workable long-term approach is to identify the errors which require additional information and modify the error-handling code to provide that information. You can often catch a lot of them in one pass to production, but there will be stragglers. In time that number would decrease. It's not the most desirable approach from management's perspective because it often requires two production releases to fix one error (one release to add more logging, another to actually fix the error after the necessary runtime information is provided). But, well, that's the technical debt incurred from such novel gems of bad code as this:

catch (Exception ex)
{
    Logger.Log(ex.ToString());
}
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@David's approach is fine if your Logger is exposed at the same level as GetAge or GetName. However if you're logger is at a higher level (e.g. a Top Level Exception handler) and you want to add context to an exception that is at a lower level you might want to wrap exceptions instead if you want to add context to an error.

e.g.

private int GetAge (int ID)
{
   try 
   {
        GetAgeFromFile(ID)


   }
   catch {System.IO.Exception e }
   {
        throw new CommunctionError(
        string.Format("Cannot access age file ID:{0}.",ID) ,
        e);
   }

}

Note that the exception filter limited this to very specific errors. Except for a top level exception handlers you should always limit your catches to things you can reasonable recover from.

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