Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Below is my present 'solution' to my problem. I thought that make was supposed to do this automatically when a rule was not found for a dependency in another directory but I can't figure out why I thought that. Do you know of a better way?

There is another directory ../a/ which has a Makefile to create ../a/generated.h.

.PHONY: FORCE

FORCE:

my.c: ../a/generated.h
    cp --preserve=timestamps $< $@

../a/generated.h: FORCE
    $(MAKE) -C $(dir $@) $(notdir $@)

I do have a general form I can use to avoid duplicating the second rule for each 'external' file, but as I said, I thought this was all unnecessary.

define REMOTE
$(1): FORCE
    $$(MAKE) -C $$(dir $$@) $$(notdir $$@)
endef

$(eval $(call REMOTE,../a/generated.h))
$(eval $(call REMOTE,../a/anotherGeneratedFile.h))
share|improve this question
    
This doesn't look like a very good design. Do you have many other directories with their own makefiles? –  Beta Feb 11 '13 at 20:19
    
It would seem that I was misremembering that make will automatically rebuild any files that are included in the Makefile. –  altendky Feb 12 '13 at 14:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Recursive calls of make are known to break the direct acyclic graph (DAG) of target dependencies, which may be the cause of your unexpected behavior.

One possible solution to your problem may be to have a single Makefile for your project, as suggested in "Recursive Make Considered Harmful". Otherwise you may "raise" the level of abstraction of your build-system, and move to a tool like cmake.

share|improve this answer
    
A good read and it will (presumably) improve my use of Make in general and probably even solve my underlying dilemma. Thanks. –  altendky Feb 12 '13 at 14:15

I thought that make was supposed to do this automatically when a rule was not found for a dependency in another directory but I can't figure out why I thought that.

There is no such built-in rule for GNU Make. See all built-in rules in the Catalogue of Implicit Rules.

Your solution should work in a half-way. It doesn't have the dependencies of ../a/generated.h (because you are using recursive make and those dependencies are only known to the makefile in that directory), so it won't rebuild it automatically. But it will build ../a/generated.h if it does not exist.

share|improve this answer
    
Since it explicitly calls the make in the other directory at all times (note the FORCE idiom) I believe it will 'work'. Just that it will have extra overhead and all the costs of the separated DAGs listed in Massimiliano's linked paper. –  altendky Feb 12 '13 at 14:13
    
True, unless there is a file called FORCE. FORCE should be a phony target. –  Maxim Egorushkin Feb 12 '13 at 14:22
    
That was an inaccuracy in my simplification for the question. Corrected. –  altendky Feb 12 '13 at 15:05
    
According to TFM the FORCE approach is used to compensate for lack of support for .PHONY. Though it can be nice to specify at the target rather than specify all targets in one spot. (gnu.org/software/make/manual/make.html#Force-Targets) –  altendky Feb 14 '13 at 18:34
1  
@altendky Agree. Although I once forgot to mark clean target as phony and then debugged it for a while on someone else's machine. Turned out there was a file named clean... –  Maxim Egorushkin Feb 15 '13 at 10:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.