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We have a database table called Parts.Each row is a part in the system. The primary key for this table is called ID which is the identity seed and is an integer data type. We are adding new parts to this table.

My users have give me about 1000 rows to add. I noticed they want to have ID's starting from 1000000 all the way upto 14230004. So I will add new rows by setting the identity insert ON. Also the rows added will be referenced in other tables at times from the application. These rows are also presented in the web application in a treeview.

My question, is it not a bad practice to start your ID's primary key in my case, from 1000000 where I could start from 1. Wouldnt starting from 1 help index the table better hence faster retrieval times? There is no real business need for starting ID's from such large integers as far as I understand. I just wanted to get an opinion as to if I should press the users to start the ID's from 1.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by bernie, Beth, marc_s, Harry Johnston, Jonathan Leffler Mar 8 at 1:32

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Why does your users care what your primary key is? –  Magnus Feb 11 '13 at 17:57
    
Do you mean that every user wants their own set of IDs to start from a specific number? Like User A wants them to start from 1000000, User B from 1100000 etc.? –  Andriy M Feb 11 '13 at 18:08
    
guys, thanks for answering my question. All of you answered it correctly. Appriciate it. –  tam tam Feb 11 '13 at 19:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

OK - so starting at 1 million instead of one - you have 2.04 instead of 2.14 billion rows at hand.

If you use an INT IDENTITY starting at 1 million, and you insert a row every second, around the clock, all day, every day of the year - then you need 63.4 years (instead of 66.5) before you hit the 2 billion limit ....

Is that enough for you??

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It won't matter. An int in SQL will take up just as much space as any other int. They all use 4 bytes of storage. Indexing won't care what the numbers are.

You will, however, run through all available IDs sooner. Shouldn't be a problem though since ms sql int maxes out at 2,147,483,647 (2^31-1)

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My question, is it not a bad practice to start your ID's primary key in my case, from 1000000 where I could start from 1.

Usually, when you see something like this, there's a reason.

Wouldnt starting from 1 help index the table better hence faster retrieval times?

No. When storing integers, 1000000 takes no more space than 1. A dbms can find 1000000 just as fast as it can find 1 given an identical number and distribution of rows, and given identical and unbiased indexes.

I just wanted to get an opinion as to if I should press the users to start the ID's from 1.

No, you shouldn't press users to start from 1. You should try to find out why someone else, who presumably knows something you don't, has them starting from a different number.

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Yep, I verified with the users, No real reason to start from 1000000. With that being clarified I think I will start from 1 even though based on the answers here the storage is the same. –  tam tam Feb 11 '13 at 18:08
    
Don't talk to the users. Talk to the designers. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Feb 11 '13 at 18:46

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