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Consider this simple example.

Class A {
   B b;
   A() {
       this.b = new B(this);
   }
}

In this example instance A knows about instance B, and instance B knows about instance A.

My question is: how to instantiate instance A with Guice, i.e. how to make Guice take care of this complex circle dependencies?

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You can simply add @Inject to the constructor for A. I'm guessing your actual class is bit more complicated. Is B an interface? Does it need to be injected with something besides A? BTW, letting the "this" field escape the constructor is generally a bad idea. –  NamshubWriter Sep 27 '09 at 3:48
    
No, B is not an interface but a class. Of course, circle dependencies are not good and I can refactor this two classes, but what I really need is to understand Guice feasibility. –  Yury Litvinov Sep 27 '09 at 7:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To answer your first question "how to instantiate instance A with Guice": you can simply add @Inject to the constructor:

class A {
   private final B b;

   @Inject
   A() {
       this.b = new B(this);
   }
}

This works because the API for creating A doesn't have a circular dependency. Guice will just use the A constructor any time it needs to create or inject an A object.

If your question is how to use Guice to create an object where the API for creating the object has a circular dependency, see this blog post by Misko Hevery (as mentioned in Yury's answer).

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2  
You don't even need @Inject for a no-args constructor. –  ColinD Oct 22 '09 at 20:50
    
That's the exact same code as Yury's. The @Inject takes no effect and the code doesn't decouble A from B, which is the whole point of guice. –  nes1983 May 25 '10 at 21:28
    
Yes, this is the same code as the OP wrote (with an @Inject to make it clearer that the constructor is used by Guice). The point is that there isn't a circular dependency in the API, so Guice can create A. Whether this design is a good design is a different question. You can see some of my concerns in my comments to the OP, and the OP agreed that circular dependencies are a bad idea. –  NamshubWriter May 29 '10 at 16:48

Your example is not an issue at all, since you're constructing B directly. But if you want to both A and B to be created by Guice, one or both should be an interface. You can do:

public interface A { /* skipping methods */ }
public interface B { /* skipping methods */ }

public class AImpl implements A {
   private final B b;

   @Inject
   public AImpl(B b) {
      this.b = b;
   }
   // ...
}

public class BImpl implements B {
   private final A a;

   @Inject
   public BImpl(A a) {
      this.a = a;
   }
   // ...
}

Even if AImpl and BImpl are scoped as singletons, Guice can handle this injection (by way of a proxy). This works in a simple case like this at any rate... I imagine there could be more complex circular dependencies that it couldn't handle. Anyway, eliminating circular dependencies would be preferable, of course.

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This really works ONLY for singletons. What about the general case? –  nes1983 May 25 '10 at 21:34
    
Any ideas on what's going on behind the scene of this injection? –  Andrey Chaschev Nov 6 '13 at 10:03

I think that NamshubWriter's proposal isn't very guicy. I think that in Guice, a constructor should do exactly one thing: assign parameters into fields. If there's anything else you need to do, put it into a factory or a provider.

In this case, we'll want a provider for A. The provider could directly call new B(), but then we'd directly couple A to B, which is what we tried to avoid in the first place. So we indirect the creation of B over a factory, which guice can provide for us via assistedInject. This code runs and compiles fine, and completely decouples A and B.

In a realistic scenario, you'd need to hide A and B behind interfaces to take advantage of the separation.

import com.google.inject.AbstractModule;
import com.google.inject.Guice;
import com.google.inject.Inject;
import com.google.inject.Provider;
import com.google.inject.assistedinject.Assisted;
import com.google.inject.assistedinject.FactoryProvider;

public class Try {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(
                Guice.createInjector(new MyModule()).getInstance(A.class)
        );
    }
}

class MyModule extends AbstractModule {
    public void configure() {
        bind(A.class).toProvider(AProvider.class);
        bind(IBFactory.class).toProvider(
                FactoryProvider.newFactory(IBFactory.class, B.class));
    }
}

class A {
    B b;

    public void setB(B b) {
        this.b = b;     
    }
}

class B {
    A a;

    @Inject
    B(@Assisted A a) {
        this.a = a;
    }
}

class AProvider implements Provider<A> {

    private final IBFactory bFactory;

    @Inject
    AProvider(IBFactory bFactory) {
        this.bFactory = bFactory;
    }

    public A get() {
        A a = new A();
        a.setB(bFactory.create(a));
        return a;
    }
}

interface IBFactory {
    public B create(A a);
}

I made an extended version of the circular dependency injection in Guice where A and B are hidden behind interfaces.

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The answer is that you should not use a dependency injection framework while you have circular dependences in your code.

So, you have to refactor you code beforehand. As far as I know, there are two solutions for tightly coupled classes: either merge two classes into one or introduce new class and move common logic into it (for detail look here)

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4  
I think you need to reread the bold part :) –  Lasse V. Karlsen Sep 27 '09 at 22:33
    
Agreed with Yury. Circular dependencies with DI cause pain. –  Jesse Wilson May 26 '10 at 1:37

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