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I have the following situation:



    class B;

    class A {
    private:
        int n;
    public:
        A& operator=(const A& a) {
        }

        A& operator=(const int n) {
            this->n = n;
        }

        friend class B;
    };

    class B {
    private:
        A a;
    public:
        operator A&() {
            return a;
        }

        operator int&() {
            return a.n;
        }
    };

When I execute this code:



    A a;
    B b;
    int i = b;
    a = b;
    a = i;

I have the following error:



    error C2593: 'operator =' is ambiguous
    ..\CrossPPTest\TestProxy.cpp(40): could be 'A &A::operator =(const int)'
    ..\CrossPPTest\TestProxy.cpp(37): or       'A &A::operator =(const A &)'
    while trying to match the argument list '(A, B)'

How to resolve this ambiguity assuming I can not add

A& operator =(const B&)
to class A.

There are complex reasons why I have to do exactly like this, but it would be really nice if thing like this will work.

May be there are some priorities or something like explicit keyword for operators... Any suggestions are highly appreciated.

UPDATE: Any kind of casts can not be used in second part of code. The thing is to find a solution modifying the first code part only.

ONE MORE UPDATE: Code part #2 MUST compile as is.

share|improve this question
    
Use an explicit cast. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 11 '13 at 18:22
    
@SethCarnegie I know about explicit casts, but thanks. The reason why I can't use it is that the second part of code will be written by other developers and I want to make it as easy as possible. –  Daniel Feb 11 '13 at 18:23
    
If you know about explicit casts and don't want to use them then why don't you put that in your question. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 11 '13 at 18:24
    
@SethCarnegie There are no base classes... –  Daniel Feb 11 '13 at 18:25
3  
What you have here is bad design. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 11 '13 at 18:27

2 Answers 2

This looks like a job for polymorphism:

class B;

class A {
   int n;
   public:
      A& operator=(const A& a) {...}

    A& operator=(const int n) {
      this->n = n;
      return *this;
    }

    friend class B;
};

class B : public A {
   A a;
   public:
     operator int&() {
         return a.n;
     }
};

int main() {
    A a;
    B b;
    int i = b; // works
    a = b; // works
    a = i;
}

Demo

share|improve this answer
    
Read the comments to the question. Inappropriate. –  Daniel Feb 11 '13 at 18:27
    
@Daniel See the update. Does this work for you? –  0x499602D2 Feb 11 '13 at 19:30

The way you posed makes the problem substantially unsolvable.

There are clearly two ways to assign to an A from a B, none of which is preferable.

The only solution (without touching the classes) is to explicitly cast, so that you force which conversion has to take place.

In general, assignment and conversion are redundant: if you admit implicit conversion (either to - with U::operator T() const - or from - with T::T(const U&) ) you don't have to provide assignment other than the default, and if you want implicit heterogeneous assignments, you must not provide conversion, or at most make them explicit.

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