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I guess my question topic is a bit confusing. In short, what I want:

I have a lots of Converters in my application. Many of them do not implement the ConvertBack method. So I would like to have a BaseConverter class that offers a simple empty implementation of ConvertBack and all my other Converters to inherit from the BaseConverter.

My idea of the BaseConverter:

public class BaseConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        // do nothing in this dummy implementation
        return null;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        // do nothing in this dummy implementation
        return null;
    }
}

And one of my crazy converters:

public class CrazyConverter : BaseConverter
{
    public new object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
       return ACrazyConverionOfTheValue(...);
    }
}

However, if I try it like this and use my CrazyConverter, I always end up in the Convert method of the BaseClass. My new Convertmethod is never called. What am I doing wrong?

Thanks for replies!

share|improve this question
    
So how are you actually using it in your XAML? Can you show that? –  Matt Burland Feb 11 '13 at 18:36
    
Just like this: `<Label IsEnabled="{Binding IsCrazy, Converter={StaticResource CrazyConverter}>...</Label>´ –  Michael Hilus Feb 11 '13 at 18:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to make the methods in your base class virtual, and your child classes should override them (instead of new).

public class BaseConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public virtual object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        // do nothing in this dummy implementation
        return null;
    }

    public virtual object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        // do nothing in this dummy implementation
        return null;
    }
}

public class CrazyConverter : BaseConverter
{
    public override object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
       return ACrazyConverionOfTheValue(...);
    }
}

Edit: You might also want to consider refactoring this to require that Convert be overridden by making the class and Convert abstract, like so:

public abstract class BaseConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public abstract object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture);

    public virtual object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        // do nothing in this dummy implementation
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That is working perfectly for me. I will use the abstract class approach. –  Michael Hilus Feb 11 '13 at 18:44

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