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I'm writing a website in python where I need to use PostgreSQL as my DB. I wanted to create a prepared statement for updating a table and I tried to create the set as:

a=dict(b=3, c='d', x=10)
keys=a.keys()
print ",".join([keys[i] + "=$" + str(i + 1) for i in range(0, len(keys))])

The output from this comes as

x=$1,c=$2,b=$3

which can be used to generate a prepared statement for update.

I wanted to know:

  • Is there a better alternative for this?
  • Is this a costly operation (should len(keys) be taken into a variable or is it an O(1) operation)
  • Are there multiple for loops running internally? Does a.keys() return a deep copy of keys or is it just a reference?
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are doing just fine; I use a slightly more readable version of the same code:

a=dict(b=3, c='d', x=10)
print ",".join(['{0}=${1}'.format(k, i) for i, k in enumerate(sorted(a))])

and I sorted the keys (dictionaries do not have a fixed order).

Python PostgreSQL database adapters follow the DBAPI v2.0 specification, which supports using SQL parameters and give the database a chance to prepare the statement for you. However, these use a different syntax, usually one or two of the variants named in the specification.

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Why the [] inside the .join()? Can't you leave it out and use a generator form? –  jterrace Feb 11 '13 at 18:57
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@jterrace: you can, but .join() is slow when passed a generator. Use a list comprehension instead is faster. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 11 '13 at 18:57
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interesting, did not know that –  jterrace Feb 11 '13 at 18:58
1  
@Nisan.H: The problem with .join() is that it needs to loop over the items to be joined twice. Giving it a list makes that process faster. Every time. With longer lists the difference is less pronounced but you are always going to win with a list comprehension when using .join(). –  Martijn Pieters Feb 11 '13 at 19:11
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@Mayank: Provided you don't alter the dict, you don't need to sort. It's not clear how you are going to use these prepared statements, hence my remark about the DBAPI standard. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 11 '13 at 19:13
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