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I'm making a game about a factory. The factory has crates being moved around with stuff in them. Sometimes there will be Depots containing Crates containing Items, and the workers will need to look for certain types of Items in Crates being available (for example, the worker may call a function which asks "Are there any Crates in any Depots which contain Food?", and if so, he will go pick it up and move it somewhere.

It was seeming very useful to define both "Crate" and the "Furniture" class (from which Depot inherits) with Generics to specify what types of objects they contain. Below is a snippet of my Crate class and my Furniture class, and then my Depot class which I'm struggling with:

public class Crate<I> : Item 
    where I : Item
{
}

public abstract class Furniture<I>
    where I : Item
{
}

public class Depot : Furniture<Crate<???>>
{
    //...
}

Generics is useful here because I then can write search methods like:

public I FindItem<I,F>
 where I:Item
 where F:Furniture<I>
{
    //pseudocode

    //foreach (furniture f in the factory);
    //if (f is F) foreach (I i in f)
    //if (i.IsAvailable) return i;

    //return null;
}

Now, my problem is that unlike most other funiture, Depots can take Crates with anything in them (e.g. both Crates of Food and Crates of raw materials). But I can't just specify Crate(Item) because it will mess up my search algorithms - looking for Crates of Food will return null because it only contains Crates of Items.

Should I keep generics for Crate but scrap them for StorageFurniture, and make my search algorithms slightly longer (i.e. search through all Furnitures rather than just those Furnitures which contain Items of the right type), or is there a way to get around this issue?

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3  
Consider rewriting the question to be more concise. I feel like I'd have to understand the entire system to answer this question. –  P.Brian.Mackey Feb 11 '13 at 19:05
    
I feel like if I just say "When should I use generics" the question would be too vague. In essence I want to be able to search for StorageFurniture containing Crates containing particular Items. Therefore if StorageFurniture spells out what Items it takes (sometimes this will be 'code'Crate<MyItem>'code'), then this will make finding those items and crates easier. But when certain StorageFurniture can contain any type of Crate, I don't know how to declare it. –  Haighstrom Feb 11 '13 at 19:16
    
I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". –  John Saunders Feb 11 '13 at 19:17
    
I've tried to streamline the question. –  Haighstrom Feb 11 '13 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

Consider creating a root class or interface for your Crate-able objects:

public class Crate<I> : Item 
    where I : Item
{
    private int capacity;
    private List<I> contents;
    //... and so on
}

public interface ICrateable{
// define common features such as name, ID, description etc here
}

public class Shirt: ICrateable{
// implement interface
}


public class DepotSlot : StorageFurniture<Crate<ICrateable>>
{
    // now you can add any Crate<XYZ> here
}

If you're processing Crate-s it only makes sense to have common things you'd do with them - open them, close them, put labels on them, discard them, load them on trucks, unload them, etc. All these common features can be abstracted in a root (abstract?) class or interface.

If you don't have any predefined operations with the crates you might as well just make them oject and give up the generics

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The problem is searching for specific Crates. If I want to try and find a Crate with Food in it, at the moment my search algorithm says '"for each StorageFurniture sf in my factory, if sf is StorageFurniture<Crate<Food>> check each item in it to see if it's available"'. Since the depot (unlike other Furniture) can't specify what its Crates have in them, this causes a problem... –  Haighstrom Feb 11 '13 at 19:34
    
Also my "Item" class is essentially your "ICrateable", there's no need for an interface here. Crates will only contain Items, but my question is whether I should specify what specific Item they contain, since no Crate will contain both "Food" and "Raw Materials", or whatever. –  Haighstrom Feb 11 '13 at 19:39
    
So in your Item class add a method "SearchOfType<T>(string query)" –  Sten Petrov Feb 12 '13 at 17:05

If your game will be "self-contained" within your shop, such that changing base types and recompiling everything will not be an excessive burden, I would suggest that it may be advantageous to have a many virtual methods in your base "GameObject" type, and have a field that would indicate (via "flags" enumeration) which methods will do something to a given object. If one has a list of game objects and wants to perform some action upon all objects in that list where the action is relevant (e.g. a bomb went off and one wants to "damage" all damageable items within blast range), it's faster to unconditionally invoke a virtual method is common to all objects--even those where it does nothing--than to test for each object whether it implements an interface and invoke that interface upon the object if so.

Having the field to indicate which types of calls are relevant to an object may in some cases improve performance by allowing the system to avoid doing some work before a virtual method call. For example, if testing a field will reveal that an object won't do anything with a TakeBombDamage call, one needn't waste timing computing the amount of damage the object would take.

If one takes the approach of adding virtual methods to the base class to support abilities which will be present in some but not all objects, one may minimize the need to perform run-time typecasts. This will in turn reduce the need for generics. The "kitchen-sink base class" approach is not good in situations where changes to the base class are troublesome, but can be helpful in situations where performance is important, especially for behaviors where sensible defaults exist (e.g. if a "FlashingStrobe" game object calls NoticeFlashingStrobe on nearby objects, objects that don't care about the flashing strobe may sensibly do nothing in such a method).

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