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The problem: I want to mix two colors in javascript, and get the result color. There are a lot of similar question on SO, however I doesn't find anything that actually works correctly. I know that mixing two different colored paints(pigments) and lights will give very different results (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_mixing).

Here are the questions and suggested solutions I've already seen, and tried to implement:

1: Mixing two RGB color vectors to get resultant
So, mixing colors in RGB. I implemented it, and in some cases it works in some cases it doesn't.

Working example: Mixing red with yellow -> orange. Great!
http://jsbin.com/afomim/1/edit

Not working example: Mixing blue with yellow -> gray. Not so great! :) http://jsbin.com/afomim/5/edit
I know that in RGB mixing blue with yellow will never make green, and I understand why.

We will not find the answer here, let's go forward.

2: Adding Colours (Colors) Together like Paint (Blue + Yellow = Green, etc)

Let's try to work with CMYK values as suggested in this discussion. Mixing cyan with yellow gives green:
http://jsbin.com/igaveg/1/edit
but mixing blue with yellow results in black.
http://jsbin.com/igaveg/2/edit -> Not working!

3: How to mix colors "naturally" with C#?
A very similar question. The most upvoted answer suggests to convert colors to LAB, and this solution seems promising.
So I converted my colors to LAB. The conversion algo is correct, I tested it!

http://jsbin.com/oxefox/1/edit

Now I have the two colors in LAB, but how to mix them?

NOTE I know that probably I will not find an algo that mixes blue with yellow and will give the perfect green, but I hope I can generate something similar to green :)

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I am just curious: Why should blue and yellow mix to green (or something similar)? –  Martin R Feb 12 '13 at 9:57
    
By blue I doesn't meen exactly #0000ff, and or by yellow #ffff00, but in real world, if you mix some blue with some yellow, most of the time you got some green. This app: fiftythree.com/paper (awarded by apple) has some great color mixing functions, and they say they were working on it more than a year :) If you check their page, you see that they apply the same theory about blue and yellow. –  Tamás Pap Feb 12 '13 at 10:10

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I dedicated 3-4 days to this question. It's a really complex problem.

Here is what you can do if you want to mix two colors "naturally":

  1. CMYK mixing: it's not the perfect solution, but if you need a solution now, and you don't want to spend months with learning about the subject, experimenting and coding, you can check this out: https://github.com/AndreasSoiron/Color_mixer

  2. Implementing the Kubelka-Munk theory. I spent a lot of time reading about it, and trying to understand it. This should be the way to go if you want a professional solution, but it needs 6 parameters (like reflectance, absorption, etc.) for each colors you want to mix. Having R, G, B isn't enough. Implementing the theory isn't hard, but getting those parameters you need about each color seems to be the missing part. If you figure it out how to do it, let me know :)

  3. Experimental: you can do something what the developers of the ipad app: Paper have done. They manually selected 100 pairs of popular colors and eyeball-tested how they should blend. Learn more about it here.

I personally will implement the CMYK mixing for the moment, and maybe later, if I have time I'll try to make something like the guys at Fiftythree. Will see :)

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1  
Thanks for sharing your results! –  Martin R Mar 9 '13 at 11:22

The RYB Color Model could be a suitable choice for the color mixing calculations. According to Wikipedia, it is primarily used in art and design education, particularly painting.

To mix 2 colors, one converts both colors from RGB to RYB, mixes the colors by adding each color component, and converts the resulting color from RYB back to RGB.

I have tried this using the Online Color Mixing Tool, and the results are

  • #0000FF (blue) mixed with #FFFF00 (yellow) gives #008000 (dark green),
  • #FF0000 (red) mixed with #FFFF00 (yellow) gives #FFA000 (orange).

So this method produces exactly the results that you expected.

Unfortunately, I was not able to find a reference with "ready-to-use" formula to convert from RGB to RYB and back to RGB.

The paper Paint Inspired Color Mixing and Compositing for Visualisation - Gossett and Chen describes the general idea of the RYB color model in the section "2 ACHIEVING INTUITIVE COLOR MIXING".

According to that paper, the conversion from RYB to RGB is done by Trilinear interpolation.

The difficult part is the conversion from RGB to RYB, because it requires the inversion of the trilinear interpolation. See Conversion between RGB and RYB color spaces for more more information.

Even if this answer does not provide complete formula for the calculation, I hope that it gives some ideas how to proceed.

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Thank you for your detailed answer. It is very helpful. I tried a lot of things, and had some success in HSL and LAB spaces, but I'm still looking for a better solution. I will inspect the RYB model tomorrow, and will come back with my results. –  Tamás Pap Feb 12 '13 at 21:10
    
I'm still in the learning and experimenting phase, but I will back with the results. :) –  Tamás Pap Feb 13 '13 at 15:01
    
@TamasPap: Let me know if you are stuck somewhere, perhaps I can help. –  Martin R Feb 13 '13 at 15:07
    
I can now convert ryb to rgb, and I'm working on rgb to ryb. In your first example: #0000FF (blue) mixed with #FFFF00 (yellow) gives #008000 (dark green), can you explain please how 00800 resulted from adding 0000FF and FFFF00. Because if I simply add components I get FFFFFF, if I calculate the average of them I got 7A7A7A. So, after having the 2 colors in RYB how should I "mix" them? I hope we can figure it out :) –  Tamás Pap Feb 15 '13 at 17:16
    
@TamasPap: I have done this only with the Online Color Mixing Tool. As I understand it: Blue in RYB is (1.0, 0.0, 0.0), Yellow in RYB is (0.0, 1.0, 0.0). If you add this in RYB you get (1.0, 1.0, 0.0). Now you have to convert this value back to RGB, and this should give some dark green. - It seems to me that the "Online Color Mixing Tool" uses conversions that are slightly different from the values in the paper by Gossett and Chen. The tool uses JavaScript, so one could inspect that. –  Martin R Feb 15 '13 at 17:43

Now that you have your two colors in LAB (or L*a*b*) format, you can average them together.

L(result) = L(first color) + L(second color) / 2
A(result) = A(first color) + A(second color) / 2
B(result) = B(first color) + B(second color) / 2

You already knew this, right? because this is what you were doing with your original RGB colors to average them.

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Trying to implement it! Thank you! –  Tamás Pap Feb 11 '13 at 19:36

With CIELAB colors you have three coordinates for each of your two colors in the LAB color space. (By the way, excellent work in getting this far). What will work best and be easiest to implement for you is to find the three-dimensional midpoint of an imaginary line segment joining the two points in LAB space. You can do this easily by just averaging each of the components of your two colors: the average L, average a and average b. Then convert this color back into RGB space by reversing your transformation (make sure your lighting space stays the same both ways).

Your new color may be outside the RGB color space. You may decide to clip to the nearest visible color in this case. (Blues are especially vulnerable to this).

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Will give it a try now, and will come back with the results! Thank you! –  Tamás Pap Feb 11 '13 at 19:35
    
Jsbin is down, so I implemented it on codepen: codepen.io/anon/pen/pscJr, but not gives the expected result :( Any other ideas? :) –  Tamás Pap Feb 11 '13 at 19:50

Here's a good article I wrote on color mixing in the CIE-LCh color-space, which produces a mixture that preserves hue, saturation, and luminance in a way that consistent with your eye's perception.

Improved Color Blending

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Note that link-only answers are discouraged, SO answers should be the end-point of a search for a solution (vs. yet another stopover of references, which tend to get stale over time). Please consider adding a stand-alone synopsis here, keeping the link as a reference. –  kleopatra Feb 28 at 23:14
    
Thank you for sharing. I will have a closer look as soon as I can! –  Tamás Pap Mar 1 at 10:21
    
I thought I did pretty much did include an answer which serves as a synopsis: mix the colors in CIE-LCh color space. It's easy to Google it if the link dries up. –  Toxikman Mar 1 at 22:54

You need to use CMY or RGB color model.

Why Blue + Yellow cannot be Gray?

Blue + Yellow = (Cyan + Magenta) + Yellow => Gray. Why not?

Look at this.

So you can use RGB (CMY) to mix colors.

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