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I'm using WPF. Is there any way to get an effect like this one:

enter image description here

LineEffect

So basically a gradient with multiple lines on top. The number lines should increase based on the width/height of the element.

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Please mark answer if it's what were you looking for. Thanks! –  Aleksandar Toplek Feb 11 '13 at 22:07
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would use two layers, first rect is background and second is that are overlapping

<!-- Background gradient -->
<Rectangle Width="200" Height="100">
    <Rectangle.Fill>
        <LinearGradientBrush EndPoint="0.5,1" StartPoint="0.5,0">
            <GradientStop Color="#FF5B5B5B" Offset="0.008"/>
            <GradientStop Color="#FFA6A6A6" Offset="1"/>
        </LinearGradientBrush>
    </Rectangle.Fill>    
</Rectangle>

<!-- Lines layer -->
<Rectangle Width="200" Height="100">
    <Rectangle.Fill>
        <VisualBrush
                TileMode="Tile"
                Viewport="0,0,7,7"
                ViewportUnits="Absolute"
                Viewbox="0,0,7,7"
                ViewboxUnits="Absolute" >
            <VisualBrush.Visual>
                <Line X1="7" X2="0" Y1="0" Y2="7" Stroke="Gray" />
            </VisualBrush.Visual>
        </VisualBrush>
    </Rectangle.Fill>
</Rectangle>

In response to @Shlomo

You could eventually change brush to contain two lines instead of one to get rid of spacing when zoomed-in. The solution would look something like this:

<VisualBrush.Visual>
    <Grid>
        <Line X1="10" X2="0" Y1="0" Y2="10" Stroke="Gray" />
        <Line X1="4" X2="-1" Y1="-1" Y2="4" Stroke="Gray" />
    </Grid>
</VisualBrush.Visual>

In this way we don't need those ugly approximated numbers.

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1  
Thanks to the both of you @Aleksandar-Toplek and @Shlomo! These were exactly the answers I was looking for. –  user18247 Feb 11 '13 at 22:43
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Working off of Aleksander's solution. It fixes up the flaws that the lines look like a line of sausages if you zoom in on them.

<!-- Background gradient -->
<Rectangle Width="200" Height="100">
    <Rectangle.Fill>
        <LinearGradientBrush EndPoint="0.5,1" StartPoint="0.5,0">
            <GradientStop Color="#FF5B5B5B" Offset="0.008"/>
            <GradientStop Color="#FFA6A6A6" Offset="1"/>
        </LinearGradientBrush>
    </Rectangle.Fill>    
</Rectangle>

<!-- Lines layer -->
<Rectangle Width="200" Height="100">
    <Rectangle.Fill>
        <VisualBrush
                TileMode="Tile"
                Viewport="0,0,10,10"
                ViewportUnits="Absolute"
                Viewbox="0,0,10,10"
                ViewboxUnits="Absolute" >
            <VisualBrush.Visual>
                <Grid>
                    <Line Fill="#777" X1="0" X2="10" Y1="10" Y2="0" Stroke="Gray" StrokeThickness="1" />
                    <Line Fill="#777" X1="0" X2="0.35355339059327376220042218105242" Y1="0" Y2="0.35355339059327376220042218105242" Stroke="Gray" />
                    <Line Fill="#777" X1="9.6464466094067262377995778189476" X2="10" Y1="9.6464466094067262377995778189476" Y2="10" Stroke="Gray" />
                </Grid>
            </VisualBrush.Visual>
        </VisualBrush>
    </Rectangle.Fill>
</Rectangle>
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I have removed those ugly approximated numbers now, check my response... How did you get to those numbers anyway, brute-force? :D –  Aleksandar Toplek Feb 11 '13 at 22:08
1  
Right isosceles triangles are created by the corner of the diagonal line and the square viewport. Since the stroke thickness is 1, the two sides are .5 each, so the length needs to be root(.25 + .25) / 2 => .35355... The other number is 10 minus that. –  Shlomo Feb 11 '13 at 22:14
    
Needless to say, your answer is much more elegant. –  Shlomo Feb 11 '13 at 23:13
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Here is an example that should work for you.

    <Rectangle Width="200" Height="100">
        <Rectangle.Fill>
            <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0,0" EndPoint="1,1">
                <GradientStop Color="Yellow" Offset="0.0" />
                <GradientStop Color="Red" Offset="0.25" />
                <GradientStop Color="Blue" Offset="0.75" />
                <GradientStop Color="LimeGreen" Offset="1.0" />
            </LinearGradientBrush>
        </Rectangle.Fill>
    </Rectangle>
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I'm not looking for an linear gradient. I'm more interested in line on top of a gradient. –  user18247 Feb 11 '13 at 19:22
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