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I have an RSA public key, some data and a signature of that data. I need to verify the signature. However, the signature is not of a digest of the data, but of the entire data. (The data itself is only 16 bytes, so the signer doesn't bother to hash the data before signing it.) I can verify the signature in C by specifying a NULL engine when initializing the context:

EVP_PKEY_CTX *ctx = EVP_PKEY_CTX_new(verify_key, NULL);

However, I have been unable to find an equivalent in Ruby's OpenSSL::PKey::PKey verify method. That method requires a Digest object, and there is no Digest that I can find that doesn't actually hash but just returns the data as-is. I tried creating my own Digest subclass, but I don't believe that can work, since the underlying OpenSSL library won't know about the existence of a custom digest type.

Am I stuck, or is there a way to solve this problem given that I cannot modify the code run by the signer?

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Does this use PKCS#1v1.5 padding without hashing(ugly but reasonably secure), or does it use no padding at all(probably totally broken)? –  CodesInChaos Feb 11 '13 at 20:36
    
It uses PKCS#1v1.5 padding without hashing. –  Wammer Feb 11 '13 at 20:45
2  
Have you tried to find a function like public_decrypt? It may work, as normally you should not encryption with a private key and decrypt with a public key. With a bit of luck it will accept the signature version of PKCS#1 padding (note that the padding used for encryption and signing is different in PKCS#1). –  Maarten Bodewes Feb 11 '13 at 20:46
    
Of course - decrypting the signature with the public key and verifying that it matches the data works fine. So far this is working fine with the standard PKCS#1 padding, but I'll do some more research to see if the differing encryption and signing paddings are a problem in practice. Thanks. –  Wammer Feb 11 '13 at 21:01
    
After a decrypt and validation of the padding, all that is left is a (if possible, secure) compare. So that would replace the verification function pretty well. Most of the security is in the modular arithmetic and padding. –  Maarten Bodewes Feb 11 '13 at 23:12

1 Answer 1

Summarizing the answer from the comments in order to remove this question from the "Unanswered" filter...

owlstead:

Have you tried to find a function like public_decrypt? It may work, as normally you should not encryption with a private key and decrypt with a public key. With a bit of luck it will accept the signature version of PKCS#1 padding (note that the padding used for encryption and signing is different in PKCS#1).

Wammer:

Of course - decrypting the signature with the public key and verifying that it matches the data works fine. So far this is working fine with the standard PKCS#1 padding, but I'll do some more research to see if the differing encryption and signing paddings are a problem in practice. Thanks.

owlstead:

After a decrypt and validation of the padding, all that is left is a (if possible, secure) compare. So that would replace the verification function pretty well. Most of the security is in the modular arithmetic and padding.

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