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I have the following models defined:

public class Account {
   public int Id {get; set;}
   ... // other account properties

   public ICollection<AccountAddress> Addresses {get; set;}
}

public class Address {
    public int Id {get; set;}
    public string Street1 {get; set;}
    public string Street2 {get; set;}
    ... // other standard address properties
}

public class AccountAddress : Address {
  public int AccountId {get; set;}
  public DateTime? BeginDate {get; set;}
  public string Notes {get; set;}
  ... // other account address specific properties
}

public class Site {
  public int Id {get; set;}
  public Address SiteAddress {get; set;}
}

The idea is that any Address can be tied to any Account as well as to any Site. However, any time an Address is associated with an Account, there may be additional information that needs to be stored about that address.

Since AccountAddress inherits from Address, I wanted to use TPT (Table Per Type) inheritance to map Address properties to the Address table and the extended properties to an table of extended address properties.

I tried this:

public class AccountConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<Account>
{
    public AccountConfiguration()
    {
        ToTable("Accounts");
        HasKey(a => a.Id);
        HasMany(a => a.Addresses).WithMany().Map(x =>
        {
           x.MapLeftKey("accountId");
           x.MapRightKey("addressId");
           x.ToTable("accountaddresses");
        }
     }
 }

 public class AddressConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<Address>
 {
     public AddressConfiguration()
     {
         ToTable("addresses");
         HasKey(a => a.Id);
         ... // other property mappings
     }
 }

 public class AccountAddressConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<AccountAddress>
 {
     public AccountAddressConfiguration() 
     {
        ToTable("addressextended");
        ... //other property mappings
     }
  }

The problem here is that there is nothing defined to map accountId into the addressextended table. So if an Address with an Id of 40 is tied to two different accounts, doing the following query:

var _account = _context.Accounts
   .Include(a => a.Addresses)
   .SingleOrDefault(a => a.Id = 1234);

sometimes gives the extended properties for the wrong account.

What do I need to do in order to get this working?

EDIT: While the accepted answer did not specifically answer my question (i.e. how can I define a many to many relationship between two entities where one entity is defined with TPT inheritance mapping), it did provide some help in coming up with an acceptable work around.

I did drop the entity inheritance and simply added address as a property of my AccountAddress entity. I then gave AccountAddress (addressextended table) its own primary id. I changed the accountaddresses table to a join table that contains the account id and the accountaddress id (the new id of the addressextended table).

I also had to add a navigation property to AccountAddress for Address and a mapping to go along with that.

share|improve this question
    
What is the purpose of AccountAddress.AccountId when the relationship between Account and AccountAddress is many-to-many (which means that the FKs for the relationship are in the link table accountaddresses)? – Slauma Feb 11 '13 at 21:44
    
I probably didn't explain the problem very well. The idea is that when an account is tied to any address, there are specific details about that account/address relationship that I need to track. They don't belong in the address table and they can't (as far as I'm aware) be placed in the link table. For instance, account 123 and account 456 can both be tied to address 40. But, for account 123 the address has a type of Work Address while account 456 has address 40 as Mailing address or Temporary address with a purge date. – RHarris Feb 12 '13 at 3:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe you may be able to work around this problem by changing the way you view the "AccountAddress" and "SiteAddress" tables. Instead of them being subclasses of Address, why not make them "join tables". The AccountAddress entity joins an address and an account, so technically it has to own an account as well as an address. You can also specify other information that are relevant when linking an address with an account (e.g. address type, purge dates, etc).

From what I understand, the goal you are trying to achieve is to link many addresses to many accounts (or sites), and keep some metadata regarding each link.

public class Account {
   public int Id {get; set;}
   ... // other account properties

   public ICollection<AccountAddress> Addresses {get; set;}
}

public class Address {
    public int Id {get; set;}
    public string Street1 {get; set;}
    public string Street2 {get; set;}

    public ICollection<AccountAddresses> Accounts {get; set;} // this denotes your two-way connection with the Account entity
    ... // other standard address properties
}

public class AccountAddress {
  public int AccountId {get; set;}
  public virtual Account {get; set;} // these are your "Account" properties

  public int AddressId {get; set;}
  public virtual Address {get;set;} //these are your "Address" properties

  public DateTime? BeginDate {get; set;}
  public string Notes {get; set;}
  ... // other account address specific properties
}

This model would now denote the following relationship:

1 Account <-> * AccountAddress * <-> 1 Address

This simulates your Many to Many relationship between addresses and accounts by going through the AccountAddress entity.

You should then configure both the Account and Address entities to demonstrate their One-to-Many relationship with something like:

modelBuilder.Entity<Account>().HasMany(a => a.AccountAddresses)
                              .WithRequired(aa => aa.Account)
                              .HasForeignKey(aa => aa.AccountId);

modelBuilder.Entity<Address>().HasMany(a => a.Accounts)
                              .WithRequired(ac => ac.Address)
                              .HasForeignKey(ac => ac.AddressId);

Your can modify your query to look something like:

var _account = _context.Accounts
   .Include(a => a.Addresses)
   .Include(a => a.Addresses.Address)
   .SingleOrDefault(a => a.Id = 1234);
share|improve this answer
    
Jeric, thanks for your input. It seems like what you've suggested should work; however, it does clutter up the Address a bit. IOW, not every address is tied to an account or has account information. I tried to keep the example simple but in reality, there are many other classes tied to addresses that may have their own "extended" properties. So a contact address might have an address type but no begin date, purge date or primary flag. A Site address has no extended properties. The idea, though, was to be able to reuse the actual address across these different entities. – RHarris Feb 12 '13 at 13:44
    
Took me a bit to find this again. I've used this answer before I think (or one similar). – IAbstract Apr 8 at 22:11

Address is one of those types which are better of as a Complex type and not as a full entity. The main reason is that the address entities are never re-used: the relationships might be 1:n but in practice they're always 1:1. This is because logic which will define the relationships at runtime will not work with a list of existing addresses you pick the right one from (so you can re-use addresses) but will use input from the user, so you'll end up always creating a new address entity instance.

When addresses are obtained from a zipcode table, you don't need to store them at all anyway, so if you're storing address information, you will not need to store it as an entity.

A m:n relationship with 'Address' is IMHO never going to be used in practice. So refactor the entities to use Address as a complex type inside the entity. If you need different Address types, define different complex types for the different Address types. Inheritance in datamodels is something you'd want to avoid anyway, unless you're planning to re-use validation logic through polymorphism at runtime, otherwise it's actually not that great: performance will suffer and your model will actually be more complex. If you want to have a generic interface to talk to with respect to general address info, define IAddress and implement it on your complex address types.

So TL;DR: ditch the addresses as entity types and define them as complex types and get rid of the inheritance, it's not helping you here at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, I'm not sure I completely agree. We have over 1000 members all with accounts (which will have multiple addresses). We have several hundred office locations (each with one or more addresses). Most of our members (accounts) will wind up tied to one of our office addresses. IOW, the UI will allow them to select from a list of our office locations or enter a new address for the individual. This goes even further when a church has an address and one of our members is working out of the church (thus his work address is the church address). We do re-use addresses on a continuous basis. – RHarris Feb 12 '13 at 19:54
    
The other thing I was attempting to do was re-use address validation across my code as well as defining an address edit template so that in the 3 - 5 areas where addresses are used, I could use the address edit template instead of re-defining all the logic that goes with an address (i.e. select a country and filter the list of states/provinces, etc). – RHarris Feb 12 '13 at 19:56

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