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I make an API call to a third party and the results are returned to me in a hash value that I named %hash.

When I print the results using Data::Dumper I get the following results:

print Dumper %hash;

$VAR1 = '';
$VAR2 = {
     'Field1' => 'first result',
     'Field2' => {},
     'Field3' => 'random value',
     'Field4' => {},
     'Field5' => '102',
     'Field6' => '3600176056428',
     'Field7' => 'AhhRbwSXxIzaSZYuvgXE8AmAXUdy'
};

I'm not accustomed to Dumper returning two values. I printed the structure so that I could determine how to access the values it holds. I want to access the hash data structure in the second VAR ($VAR2). How exactly is this done? $hash{'Field2'} does not return any value (obviously).

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to convert hash to hash reference:

print Dumper \%hash;

Otherwise %hash is converted into list of key => value pairs. That's hash behavior in list context.

To access values you'll need to use following:

$hash{''}{'Field1'}

Because in fact you have hash of hashes.

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Ivan, I just edited the first answer above. That is indeed what was happening. The API was returning a hash reference. Once I changed the variable to a hash reference and dumped it, it is now clear to me how to access the hash values. Thank you. –  Miriam P. Raphael Feb 11 '13 at 21:51

Your %hash contains one key -- the empty string, and one value -- the data structure you see represented as $VAR2. When you call Dumper(%hash), the Dumper function receives your hash as a flattened list with two elements, so it outputs two values.

The more canonical way to use Dumper is to pass references to data structures:

print Dumper \%hash;
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So how exactly do I retrieve the value for field2? Would it be $res->{}{'Field2'} ? –  Miriam P. Raphael Feb 11 '13 at 21:45
    
Actually, I'm realizing that if I change the data structure that receives the results to a hash reference then accessing the values is no longer a problem. I realize now that the results returned are a hashref and not a hash -- this removes the complexity of accessing those hash values. Thank you. –  Miriam P. Raphael Feb 11 '13 at 21:49

Your %hash has just one key '' (empty string) which holds a hashref. It looks like this:

'' => {
     'Field1' => 'first result',
     'Field2' => {},
     'Field3' => 'random value',
     'Field4' => {},
     'Field5' => '102',
     'Field6' => '3600176056428',
     'Field7' => 'AhhRbwSXxIzaSZYuvgXE8AmAXUdy'
};

Go back to where you assign it and check if you maybe need $hash instead.

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Ordinarily you would dump a hash by reference, so print Dumper \%hash.

As it stands, Data::Dumper will print a list of the hash keys and values, so it appears that your %hash has a single element with the empty string as a key.

You can access this as $hash{''}, so the values are $hash{''}{Field1} etc.

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