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I am trying to create a generic function map using templates.The idea is to inherit from this generic templated class with a specific function pointer type. I can register a function in the global workspace, but I'd rather collect all the functions together in the derived class and register these in the constructor. I think I am almost here but I get a compile error. Here is a stripped down version of my code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <cassert>
using namespace std; 

int f(int x) { return 2 * x; }
int g(int x) { return -3 * x; }
typedef int (*F)(int);

// function factory
template <typename T>
class FunctionMap {
public: 
    void registerFunction(string name, T fp) {
        FunMap[name] = fp;
    }
    T getFunction(string name) {
        assert(FunMap.find(name) != FunMap.end());
        return FunMap[name];
    }
private:
    map<string, T> FunMap;
};

// specific to integer functions 
class IntFunctionMap : public FunctionMap<F> {
public:
    int f2(int x) { return 2 * x; }
    int g2(int x) { return -3 * x; }
    IntFunctionMap() {
        registerFunction("f", f); // This works
        registerFunction("f2", f2); // This does not
    }
};

int main()
{
     FunctionMap<F> fmap; // using the base template class directly works
     fmap.registerFunction("f", f);
     F fun = fmap.getFunction("f");
     cout << fun(10) << endl; 
     return 0;
}

The error I get is:

templatefunctions.cpp: In constructor ‘IntFunctionMap::IntFunctionMap()’:
templatefunctions.cpp:33: error: no matching function for call to     ‘IntFunctionMap::registerFunction(const char [3], <unresolved overloaded function type>)’
templatefunctions.cpp:15: note: candidates are: void FunctionMap<T>::registerFunction(std::string, T) [with T = int (*)(int)]
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1 Answer 1

Juan's answer is correct: member functions have an implicit first parameter, which is a pointer to the type of which they are a member. The reason your code fails to compile is that your map supports function pointers with type int (*)(int), but the type of f2 is int (IntFunctionMap::*)(int).

In the specific case that you show here, you can use std::function, which implements types erasure, to present free functions and member functions as the same type. Then you could do what you are trying to do. Note: this requires C++11.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <cassert>
#include <function>
#include <bind>

using namespace std; 

int f(int x) { return 2 * x; }
int g(int x) { return -3 * x; }

typedef std::function<int (int)> F;

// function factory
template <typename T>
class FunctionMap {
public: 
    void registerFunction(string name, T fp) {
        FunMap[name] = fp;
    }
    T getFunction(string name) {
        assert(FunMap.find(name) != FunMap.end());
        return FunMap[name];
    }
private:
    map<string, T> FunMap;
};

// specific to integer functions 
class IntFunctionMap : public FunctionMap<F> {
public:
    int f2(int x) { return 2 * x; }
    int g2(int x) { return -3 * x; }

    IntFunctionMap() {
        registerFunction("f", f); // This works
        registerFunction("f2", std::bind(&f2, this, _1)); // This should work, too!
    }
};

int main()
{
     FunctionMap<F> fmap; // using the base template class directly works
     fmap.registerFunction("f", f);
     F fun = fmap.getFunction("f");
     cout << fun(10) << endl; 
     return 0;
}
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