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I have a nonzero symmetric matrix 'matr' that is 12000X12000. I need to find the indices of the top 10000 elements in 'matr' in R. The code I have written takes a long time - I was wondering if there was any pointers to make it faster.

listk<-numeric(0)
for( i in 1:10000)
{
idx <-which(matr == max(matr),arr.ind=T)
if( length(idx) !=0) {
listk <- rbind( listk, idx[1,])
matr[idx[1,1],idx[1,2]]<-0
matr[idx[2,1],idx[2,2]]<-0
} }
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2 Answers 2

Here's how you might find the indices (ij) of the 4 largest elements in a 10-by-10 matrix m.

## Sample data
m <- matrix(runif(100), ncol=10)

## Extract the indices of the 4 largest elements
(ij <- which(m >= sort(m, decreasing=T)[4], arr.ind=TRUE))
#      row col
# [1,]   2   1
# [2,]   5   1
# [3,]   6   2
# [4,]   3  10

## Use the indices to extract the values
m[ij]
#  [1] 0.9985190 0.9703268 0.9836373 0.9914510

Edit:

For large matrices, performing a partial sort will be a faster way to find the 10,000th largest element:

v <- runif(1e7)
system.time(a <- sort(v, decreasing=TRUE)[10000])
#    user  system elapsed 
#    4.35    0.03    4.38 
system.time(b <- -sort(-v, partial=10000)[10000])
#    user  system elapsed 
#    0.60    0.09    0.69 
a==b
# [1] TRUE
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldnt sorting a 12k*12k matrix take a really long time? –  user1775614 Feb 11 '13 at 22:44
    
@user1775614 -- It's not slow: j <- runif(1e7); system.time(sort(j)) takes just about 4 seconds on my computer. Sorting your matrix does take too much memory on my (32-bit) computer. A 6000-by-6000 matrix is sortable though (in 17 seconds) so you could presumably split your matrix in 4, extract the top 10k elements from each, find the top 10k from among those 40k, and then return to the original matrix to find the indices of the largest 10k. –  Josh O'Brien Feb 11 '13 at 23:02
    
that helps! thanks! R is so counter intuitive. I thought iterating through it, would be faster than having R sort the matrix. Almost went back to writing code in C for it. –  user1775614 Feb 11 '13 at 23:05
    
Somewhat along those lines, you might find this post interesting. (It shows how you could use C++ from within R to sort and then extract the nth element from an R vector object.) There is some speed advantages, but I'd be even more interested to learn whether that code gets you around R's memory limitation in this case. –  Josh O'Brien Feb 11 '13 at 23:10
1  
@JoshO'Brien a second big memory use is m >= ..., making a logical matrix the same size as m, whereas what you want in the end is just an integer vector of length n = 10000. It would be natural to pre-allocate and fill the return vector iteratively in C / C++ and avoid the big memory allocation; probably the iteration would be prohibitively expensive in R? Also one might think of a data structure like a priority queue would have a reasonable implementation in C++ but would be difficult to implement efficiently in R. –  Martin Morgan Feb 12 '13 at 0:23

I like @JoshO'Brien 's answer; the use of partial sorting is great! Here's an Rcpp solution (I'm not a strong C++ programmer so probably bone-headed errors; corrections welcome... how would I template this in Rcpp, to handle different types of input vector?)

I start by including the appropriate headers and using namespaces for convenience

#include <Rcpp.h>
#include <queue>

using namespace Rcpp;
using namespace std;

Then arrange to expose my C++ function to R

// [[Rcpp::export]]
IntegerVector top_i_pq(NumericVector v, int n)

and define some variables, most importantly a priority_queue to hold as a pair the numeric value and index. The queue is ordered so the smallest values are at the 'top', with small relying on the standard pair<> comparator.

typedef pair<double, int> Elt;
priority_queue< Elt, vector<Elt>, greater<Elt> > pq;
vector<int> result;

Now I'll walk through the input data, adding it to the queue if either (a) I don't yet have enough values or (b) the current value is larger than the smallest value in the queue. In the latter case, I pop off the smallest value, and insert it's replacement. In this way the priority queue always contains the n_max largest elements.

for (int i = 0; i != v.size(); ++i) {
    if (pq.size() < n)
        pq.push(Elt(v[i], i));
    else {
        Elt elt = Elt(v[i], i);
        if (pq.top() < elt) {
            pq.pop();
            pq.push(elt);
        }
    }
}

And finally I pop the indexes from the priority queue into the return vector, remembering to translate to 1-based R coordinates.

result.reserve(pq.size());
while (!pq.empty()) {
    result.push_back(pq.top().second + 1);
    pq.pop();
}

and return the result to R

return wrap(result);

This has nice memory use (the priority queue and return vector are both small relative to the original data) and is fast

> library(Rcpp); sourceCpp("top_i_pq.cpp"); z <- runif(12000 * 12000)
> system.time(top_i_pq(z, 10000))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.992   0.000   0.998 

Problems with this code include:

  1. The default comparator greater<Elt> works so that, in the case of a tie spanning the value of the _n_th element, the last, rather than first, duplicate is retained.

  2. NA values (and non-finite values?) may not be handled correctly; I'm not sure whether this is true or not.

  3. The function only works for NumericVector input, but the logic is appropriate for any R data type for which an appropriate ordering relationship is defined.

Problems 1 and 2 can likely be dealt with by writing an appropriate comparator; maybe for 2 this is already implemented in Rcpp? I don't know how to leverage C++ language features and the Rcpp design to avoid re-implementing the function for each data type I want to support.

Here's the full code:

#include <Rcpp.h>
#include <queue>

using namespace Rcpp;
using namespace std;

// [[Rcpp::export]]
IntegerVector top_i_pq(NumericVector v, int n)
{
    typedef pair<double, int> Elt;
    priority_queue< Elt, vector<Elt>, greater<Elt> > pq;
    vector<int> result;

    for (int i = 0; i != v.size(); ++i) {
        if (pq.size() < n)
            pq.push(Elt(v[i], i));
        else {
            Elt elt = Elt(v[i], i);
            if (pq.top() < elt) {
                pq.pop();
                pq.push(elt);
            }
        }
    }

    result.reserve(pq.size());
    while (!pq.empty()) {
        result.push_back(pq.top().second + 1);
        pq.pop();
    }

    return wrap(result);
}
share|improve this answer
    
nice. I did not see this before. I'll play with this and let you know if I can improve on it. templating it for numeric and integer cases should not be too hard. –  Romain Francois Aug 26 '13 at 21:01
    
Luckily, evalCpp( NA_REAL > 2.0 ) gives FALSE and so does evalCpp( NA_INTEGER > 2 ) so indices for missing values won't enter the queue. –  Romain Francois Aug 30 '13 at 14:34
1  
For more on this approach, and a templated generalization of it, see this post in the Rcpp gallery, –  Josh O'Brien May 27 '14 at 20:34

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