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have to create an abstract class, say Part. But there are two type of parts,

Part1: This part has 3 instance variables, inside,outside,middle

Part2: This part has 2 instance variables, top, bottom

Finally, both Part are extending an abstract class Part, so finally, in Java its like this

abstract Class Object{
   public abstract String toString();
}

abstract class Part{
    abstract void print();
}

Class Part1 extends Part1{
    List <Object> inside = new ArrayList <Object> ();
    List <Object> outside = new ArrayList <Object> ();
    List <Object> medium = new ArrayList <Object> ();
    void print(){
        //go through all the list and print the object
    }
}

Class Part1 extends Part2{
    List <Object> top = new ArrayList <object> ();
    List <Object> bottom = new ArrayList <object> ();
    void print(){
        //go through all the list and print the object
    }
}

my issue is which design pattern can I apply for the creation of Part, I'm still a newbie in pattern, for me its builder because I have to come up with the same type of Object having different representation. But the object is not complex !!

share|improve this question
3  
I'm not sure this question is answerable when it's this vague. You have to consider why you need to abstract Part creation. I.e. how will whichever design pattern you should use be applied in the rest of the codebase? Otherwise they're all as valid as the others. (That is, all equally useless.) – millimoose Feb 11 '13 at 22:25
    
The class using the object Part doesn't care its instance variable but only its print methods, so, in that class, I think we should abstract it creation and only give the client a part object on which it can invoke the print method, am i right?? – Noor Feb 11 '13 at 22:26
    
Yes, but that's true for any objects with a shared interface at the point where they're used, and it doesn't matter if they were created using a factory or a builder or by a constructor call. I was asking for some input on how the code where these objects will be created / managed, because that's what's relevant to deciding how to abstract their creation. – millimoose Feb 11 '13 at 22:29

See http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/C%2B%2B_Programming/Code/Design_Patterns#Creational_Patterns.

I prefere factory pattern usage or prototype:

Prototype example:

Class PartsFactory
{
    Part createPart(string partType)
    {
        if (partType.equals("Type1")) return new Part1();
        if (partType.equals("Type2")) return new Part2();
        return null;
    }
}

Factory example:

interface PartsFactory
{
    Part createPart();
}

Class Parts1Factory implements PartsFactory
{
    Part createPart()
    {
        return new Part1();
    }
}

Class Parts2Factory implements PartsFactory
{
    Part createPart()
    {
        return new Part2();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
for the factory example, the create method takes different parameters, sometimes inside,outside,medium or sometimes top,bottom – Noor Feb 11 '13 at 22:37

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