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As far as I know there is no shared trait in the collections library that defines the map method (most likely because there are different signatures for map).

I have an observable value (think of a property in a ui system) that has a change event. The observable values can be mapped using a map method.

When we are however working with a type that already has a map method, we should be able to use the built-in method of map.

So instead of:

prop map { x => 
  x map { actualX =>
   //do something
  }
}

I want to use it like this:

prop map { actualX =>
  //do something
}

I have a simplified test case. First the different parts I am using:

// leaving out the observable part
trait ObservableValue[T] {
  def value: T
}

trait LowerPriorityImplicits {
  // default implementation that adds a regular map method
  implicit class RichObservableValue1[A](o: ObservableValue[A]) {
    def map[B](f: A => B): ObservableValue[B] = new ObservableValue[B] {
      def value = f(o.value)
    }
  }
}

object ObservableValue extends LowerPriorityImplicits {

  // describe a type that has a map method
  type HasMapMethod[A, Container[X]] = {
    def map[B](f: A => B): Container[B]
  }

  // complex implementation that uses the builtin map if present
  implicit class RichObservableValue2[A, Container[Z] <: HasMapMethod[Z, Container]](
      o: ObservableValue[Container[A]]) {

    def map[B](f: A => B): ObservableValue[Container[B]] = 
      new ObservableValue[Container[B]] {
        def value = o.value.map(f)
      }
  }
}

If there is something (or maybe a lot) wrong with the above code let me know. I want to use it like this:

class TestCase extends ObservableValue[Option[Int]] {
  def value = None
}

val x = new TestCase

x map { value =>
  // this fails because the compiler finds the lower priority implicit
  (value: Int).toString
}

// the method itself works fine
ObservableValue.RichObservableValue2(x) map { value =>
  (value: Int).toString
}

If I change Container[B] into Any it will find the RichObservableValue2 implicit conversion.

My knowledge about how types are used to select implicits is limited.

I tried to find the answer in the following locations, but the subject is a bit overwhelming:

Is there anyway to solve this challenge?

Edit

I know about the FilterMonadic trait for collections. I am looking for a solution that recognizes the map method as defined in the Option class.

Edit 2

It seems the FilterMonadic variant is not working either. I added RichObservableValue3 to the RichObservableValue object.

implicit class RichObservableValue3[A, C[Z] <: FilterMonadic[Z, C[Z]]](o: ObservableValue[C[A]]) {

  def map[B, That](f: A => B)(implicit bf: CanBuildFrom[C[A], B, That]): ObservableValue[That] = new ObservableValue[That] {
    def value = o.value.map(f)

    val change = o.change map (_ map f)
  }
}

And again that implicit conversion is not chosen although a List[Int] is a valid argument. I must be missing some rule that is used when selecting implicits.

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1  
After an inexcusably brief glance at your question, I suggest you contemplate "Deprecating the Observer Pattern" by Maier and Odersky: lampwww.epfl.ch/~imaier/pub/DeprecatingObserversTR2010.pdf –  Randall Schulz Feb 12 '13 at 0:26
    
I'm a little confused by "As far as I know there is no shared trait in the collections library that defines the map method (most likely because there are different signatures for map)." Traversable, the base trait of every collection, defines map. –  Alex DiCarlo Feb 12 '13 at 21:45
    
I am sorry, I meant Option as a collection as well. I should have probably called it differently. FilterMonadic is available for most collections, but it would be nice to have a more generic test on an appropriate map method. I will probably add a separate method for FilterMonadic, but this is more to catch Option like types. –  EECOLOR Feb 12 '13 at 22:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I finally found the part that I was missing. In order for the implicit to match I had to add the following type parameter:

T[Dummy <: Container[_]] <: ObservableValue[Dummy]

The resulting object:

object ObservableValue {

  implicit class Mappable[A](o: ObservableValue[A]) {

    def map[B](f: A => B): ObservableValue[B] = new ObservableValue[B] {
      def value = f(o.value)
    }
  }

  // FMC = FilterMonadicContainer
  // D = Dummy
  implicit class FilterMonadicMappable[A, FMC[D] <: FilterMonadic[D, FMC[D]]](o: ObservableValue[FMC[A]]) {

    def map[B, That](f: A => B)(implicit bf: CanBuildFrom[FMC[A], B, That]): ObservableValue[That] = new ObservableValue[That] {
      def value = o.value.map(f)
    }
  }

  type HasMap[A, That[_]] = {
    def map[B](f: A => B): That[B]
  }

  // OVC = ObservableValueContainer
  // MC = MappableContainer
  // D = Dummy
  implicit class SimpleMappable[A, MC[D] <: HasMap[D, MC], OVC[D <: MC[_]] <: ObservableValue[D]](o: OVC[MC[A]]) {

    def map[B](f: A => B): ObservableValue[MC[B]] = new ObservableValue[MC[B]] {
      def value = o.value.map(f)
    }
  }

}
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