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Given a set {a,b,c,d}, what's a good way to produce {a,b,c,d,ab,ac,ad,bc,bd,cd,abc,abd,abcd}?

A recursive algorithm, I think, but maybe some weird lambda thing would work better. I'm using python.

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2  
You mean like a power set of the elements? –  hughdbrown Sep 26 '09 at 22:14
    
(Is "some weird lambda thing" a technical term?) –  Glenn Maynard Sep 26 '09 at 22:43

9 Answers 9

up vote 23 down vote accepted

The Python itertools page has exactly a powerset recipe for this:

def powerset(iterable):
    "powerset([1,2,3]) --> () (1,) (2,) (3,) (1,2) (1,3) (2,3) (1,2,3)"
    s = list(iterable)
    return chain.from_iterable(combinations(s, r) for r in range(len(s)+1))

Output:

>>> list(powerset("abcd"))
[(), ('a',), ('b',), ('c',), ('d',), ('a', 'b'), ('a', 'c'), ('a', 'd'), ('b', 'c'), ('b', 'd'), ('c', 'd'), ('a', 'b', 'c'), ('a', 'b', 'd'), ('a', 'c', 'd'), ('b', 'c', 'd'), ('a', 'b', 'c', 'd')]

If you don't like that empty tuple at the beginning, you can just change the range statement to range(1, len(s)+1) to avoid a 0-length combination.

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If you're looking for a quick answer, I just searched "python power set" on google and came up with this: Python Power Set Generator

Here's a copy-paste from the code in that page:

def powerset(seq):
    """
    Returns all the subsets of this set. This is a generator.
    """
    if len(seq) <= 1:
        yield seq
        yield []
    else:
        for item in powerset(seq[1:]):
            yield [seq[0]]+item
            yield item

This can be used like this:

 l = [1, 2, 3, 4]
 r = [x for x in powerset(l)]

Now r is a list of all the elements you wanted, and can be sorted and printed:

r.sort()
print r
[[], [1], [1, 2], [1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3, 4], [1, 2, 4], [1, 3], [1, 3, 4], [1, 4], [2], [2, 3], [2, 3, 4], [2, 4], [3], [3, 4], [4]]
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Here is more code for a powerset. This is written from scratch:

>>> def powerset(s):
...     x = len(s)
...     for i in range(1 << x):
...             print [s[j] for j in range(x) if (i & (1 << j))]
...
>>> powerset([4,5,6])
[]
[4]
[5]
[4, 5]
[6]
[4, 6]
[5, 6]
[4, 5, 6]

Mark Rushakoff's comment is applicable here: "If you don't like that empty tuple at the beginning, on."you can just change the range statement to range(1, len(s)+1) to avoid a 0-length combination", except in my case you change "for i in range(1 << x)" to "for i in range(1, 1 << x)".

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def powerset(lst):
    return reduce(lambda result, x: result + [subset + [x] for subset in result],
                  lst, [[]])
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I just wanted to provide the most comprehensible solution, the anti code-golf version.

from itertools import combinations

l = ["x", "y", "z", ]

def powerset(items):
    combo = []
    for r in range(len(items) + 1):
        #use a list to coerce a actual list from the combinations generator
        combo.append(list(combinations(items,r)))
    return combo

l_powerset = powerset(l)

for i, item in enumerate(l_powerset):
    print "All sets of length ", i
    print item

The results

All sets of length 0

[()]

All sets of length 1

[('x',), ('y',), ('z',)]

All sets of length 2

[('x', 'y'), ('x', 'z'), ('y', 'z')]

All sets of length 3

[('x', 'y', 'z')]

For more see the itertools docs, also the wikipedia entry on power sets

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This is wild because none of these answers actually provide the return of an actual Python set. Here is a messy implementation that will give a powerset that actually is a Python set.

test_set = set(['yo', 'whatup', 'money'])
def powerset( base_set ):
    """ modified from pydoc's itertools recipe shown above"""
    from itertools import chain, combinations
    base_list = list( base_set )
    combo_list = [ combinations(base_list, r) for r in range(len(base_set)+1) ]

    powerset = set([])
    for ll in combo_list:
        list_of_frozensets = list( map( frozenset, map( list, ll ) ) ) 
        set_of_frozensets = set( list_of_frozensets )
        powerset = powerset.union( set_of_frozensets )

    return powerset

print powerset( test_set )
# >>> set([ frozenset(['money','whatup']), frozenset(['money','whatup','yo']), 
#        frozenset(['whatup']), frozenset(['whatup','yo']), frozenset(['yo']),
#        frozenset(['money','yo']), frozenset(['money']), frozenset([]) ])

I'd love to see a better implementation, though.

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def get_power_set(s):
  power_set=[[]]
  for elem in s:
    # iterate over the sub sets so far
    for sub_set in power_set:
      # add a new subset consisting of the subset at hand added elem
      power_set=power_set+[list(sub_set)+[elem]]
  return power_set

For example:

get_power_set([1,2,3])

yield

[[], [1], [2], [1, 2], [3], [1, 3], [2, 3], [1, 2, 3]]
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Here is my quick implementation utilizing combinations but using only built-ins.

def powerSet(array):
    length = str(len(array))
    formatter = '{:0' + length + 'b}'
    combinations = []
    for i in xrange(2**int(length)):
        combinations.append(formatter.format(i))
    sets = set()
    currentSet = []
    for combo in combinations:
        for i,val in enumerate(combo):
            if val=='1':
                currentSet.append(array[i])
        sets.add(tuple(sorted(currentSet)))
        currentSet = []
    return sets
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There is a refinement of powerset:

def powerset(seq):
    """
    Returns all the subsets of this set. This is a generator.
    """
    if len(seq) <= 0:
        yield []
    else:
        for item in powerset(seq[1:]):
            yield [seq[0]]+item
            yield item
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