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In Ruby, I'd like to acheive something like this Java sample:

class A {        
    private void f() {  System.out.println("Hello world"); }
    public  void g() { f(); }
}
class B extends A {
    public void f() { throw new RuntimeException("bad guy");}
}
public class Try {
    public static void main(String[] args) { new B().g();}
}

This will print "Hello world" in Java, but the straight Ruby transcript:

class A   
    def g; f; end 
    private
    def f; puts "Hello world"; end
end
class B < A
    def f; raise "bad guy"; end
end
B.new.g    # want greet

will of course raise a bad guy - due to differences in method lookup mechanism (I realise the meaning of 'private' is very different between these languages)

Is there any way to achieve a similar effect? I don't really care about visibility, would actually prefer all public methods here. My goal is simply to isolate a method in the superclass from overriding in subclasses (which would break the other base methods).

I guess if there is a solution, that would work with modules/includes, too?

module BaseAPI 
   def f; puts "Hello world"; end
   def g; f; end;
end
module ExtAPI 
  include BaseAPI
  # some magic here to isolate base method :f from the following one?
  def f; raise "bad guy"; end # could actually be something useful, but interfering with base 'g'
end
include ExtAPI
g # want greet


Follow-up: this looks to be the rare case where something is possible with Java but not with Ruby :-/

share|improve this question
    
Could you clean that second one up? –  SeanJA Sep 26 '09 at 22:31
    
Done (just for the record). –  inger Nov 15 '09 at 4:19

2 Answers 2

class A
  def g
    real_f
  end 
  private
  def f
    real_f
  end
  def real_f
    puts "Hello world"
  end
end
class B < A
  def f
    raise "bad guy"
  end
end
B.new.g    # want hello world


I have a feeling these obvious answers aren't what you want. Ruby just doesn't have enforcement mechanisms. But just for the record, we could construct a replacement class AA. You could even be more clever than this, and use the method_missing() to dynamically insert alias methods.

class A
  def g
    f
  end 
  def f
    puts "Hello world"
  end
end
class AA
  def initialize
    @x = A.new
  end
  def g
    @x.g
  end
  def f
    @x.f
  end
end
class B < AA
  def f
    raise "bad guy"
  end
end
B.new.g    # want hello world
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I actually didn't want to change the base class to care about 'real_f'. I mean, I'd like to override/replace any methods in the extending API, without the base API noticing it. –  inger Sep 26 '09 at 22:38
    
Ok, sorry. Sometimes the "obvious" answer is exactly why what was wanted, sometimes it isn't. :-) Here is another idea, perhaps you really need two separate types? Perhaps the real implementation of A should be a nested class? Or, class AA; class x < A; . . . –  DigitalRoss Sep 26 '09 at 22:53
    
So it seems like straight subclassing, simple module includes won't help here(although I heard 2.0 might change the override story). My use case actually has modules(rather than class inheritance - just brought that up to demonstrate the expectation in Java). I guess the essence of the workaround is that you have to have another object(sort delegate) under the hood, with it's own method table.. Maybe that wouldn't be too bad if I could automatically generate that delegate. I'll give it a thought.Thanks again. –  inger Sep 27 '09 at 0:49
class A;   def g;f;end ; private ;def f;puts "Hello world";end;end
class B < A 

  def self.method_added(name)
    if superclass.method_defined? name  or superclass.private_method_defined? name
      raise "A trial to add a new instance method: #{name}, this is not allowed." 
    end
  end 

  def f;raise "bad guy";end;

end
#=>`method_added': A trial to add a new instance method: f,
#   this is not allowed.(RuntimeError)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I guess I was misunderstable, B#f might not necessary be a bad guy - it could be a useful method from B. The only way it's bad is that it breaks A#g. I just added some clarification above - see the module example. I don't want to disallow overrides - I just want to isolate them, so that they don't interfere with the base methods. Cheers for that trick, anyway - will be useful elsewhere. –  inger Sep 26 '09 at 22:59
    
Yea got what you mean now. However I don't think that's doable in Ruby, as method dispatching is totally different from Java, in addition to the fact that Monkey Patching just works this way ;) –  khelll Sep 26 '09 at 23:32
    
I guessed that.. Knew the direct translation wouldn't work, but thought some cool metaprogramming magic would save me (I still haven't given up on this one;) Strange to stumble into something in Ruby which is less powerful than Java:-/ –  inger Sep 27 '09 at 0:27
    
Well, you could enumerate defined methods within the the class definition and save references into a Hash for later use... I think :) –  Computer Linguist Nov 13 '12 at 22:43

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