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Do I need to add @Transactional annotation to second method? I think not, but really not sure.

@Transactional
public void addUser(User u) {
    u.setCreationDate(new Date());
    userDAO.addUser(u);
}

// should I add @Transactional annotation here?
public User addUser(String name, String surname) {
    User user = new User();
    user.setName(name);
    user.setSurname(surname);
    this.addUser(user);
    return user;
}

// DAO method
public void addUser(User u) {
    entityManager.persist(u);
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to add the @Transactional annotation to the public User addUser(String name, String surname) method other wise the method will execute in a non transactional way.

@Transactional uses proxy mechanism to implement transactional support, it will be invoked only when you call the method from a second object (ie If you call a method within the same class it will not go through the proxy system so it will always run using the callers transaction).

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Both are different method as signature is diff, hence needs to add @Transactional annotation. As you knows spring is working on proxy object

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You don't need to annotate the wrapper methods if you are using default @Transactional settings. The PROPAGATION settings in @Transactional defines transactional scope. The default propagation setting is PROPAGATION_REQUIRED.

Refer here for more details.

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I just tried it in application, second method not works without @Transactional annotation. –  yons88 Feb 12 '13 at 2:30
    
What do you mean by second method not working? Are you getting any errors? what is the behaviour? –  Jayamohan Feb 12 '13 at 2:40

In your case it will produce similar result. The difference is if you put @Transactional on public User addUser(String name, String surname) you will be creating a new user under context of a transaction. If you don't -- a transaction will only start when your code executes public void addUser(User u)

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I just tried it in application, second method not works without @Transactional annotation. –  yons88 Feb 12 '13 at 2:32
    
In that case you need to give us your userDAO code. Depending on how you implement it, the outcome might be different –  gerrytan Feb 12 '13 at 5:22
    
userDAO.addUser(User u){ entityManager.persist(u); } –  yons88 Feb 12 '13 at 12:13

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