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I have a spring application, and I'm writing the web UI using Vaadin. To do so, I'm using the Spring Vaadin Integration tool.

So I'm extending Vaadin classes to customize them and use them. For example, I have my main UI class, which is a prototype. (Should instantiate a new one per browser window opened by a user.)

@Component
@Scope(value = ConfigurableBeanFactory.SCOPE_PROTOTYPE)
public class MainUI extends UI {

@Autowired
private GameMapView gameMapView;

@Override
protected void init(VaadinRequest request) {

        final VerticalLayout layout = new VerticalLayout();
        layout.setMargin(true);
        setContent(layout);

        gameMapView.configureGameMapView();
        layout.addComponent(gameMapView);
   }
}

And that imports my GameMapView, which is also a prototype component, and extends VerticalLayout, and then I have a GameMap prototype component, and it extends the GridLayout.

Now, when I use the GameMap class, I need to configure it with a dimension, and with a center tile location. (So it can set how big it is, and what tiles it is viewing.) It also needs to use one of my services to get the right tiles from the database to display.

What I would like to do is pass these to a constructor, something like this:

@Component
@Scope(value = ConfigurableBeanFactory.SCOPE_PROTOTYPE)
public class GameMap extends GridLayout {

    @Autowired
    private LandTileService lts;

    public GameMap(int dimension, int xcoor, int ycoor) {
        super();
        this.setWidth(80, Unit.PERCENTAGE);
        this.setHeight(80, Unit.PERCENTAGE);

//START configuration

        this.setRows(dimension);
        this.setColumns(dimension);

        [use the land tile service and coordinates etc.]
   //END configuration
    }
}

But the problem is that you can't use an autowired spring bean inside the constructor of a spring bean, and you also can't use an overloaded constructor with an autowired spring bean.

Right now, I'm getting around this problem by making a configuration method I just call once on my spring prototype classes before I use them, but it seems like a poor solution. Is there a better way to go about that? I'd like to be able to enforce that x, y, and z parameters must be passed to Spring Component gamemap before I can just start using it.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

But the problem is that you can't use an autowired spring bean inside the constructor of a spring bean, and you also can't use an overloaded constructor with an autowired spring bean.

By default fields autowiring happen after the bean is constructed, hence it won't be available on the constructor.

You can however use constructor autowiring by specifying it on your beans configuration file:

<beans:beans xmlns="..."  default-autowire="constructor">
</beans:beans>

Then you can inject your bean from constructor

@Service
public class FooService {
}

 

@Service
public class CowService {

   FooService fooService;

   //FooService will be injected when CowService bean is constructed
   public(FooService fooService) {
     this.fooService = fooService;
   }
}

Right now, I'm getting around this problem by making a configuration method I just call once on my spring prototype classes before I use them, but it seems like a poor solution. Is there a better way to go about that?

In your case what I'd do is to create a factory singleton class "GameMapFactory". Place it as a bean which you can inject anywhere you need. The class would have a method "createGameMap(int dimension, int xcoord, int ycoord)"

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Ah, yeah. You may be right. I'll see about making a factory for my gameMaps. That would probably be best. You make a good point about constructor injection, but considering I have beans injecting beans which inject other beans, it's probably best for me to stay away from trying to use the beans during the spring context initialization of them. –  CorayThan Feb 12 '13 at 6:50

There's an interface you can implement (or an annotation if you prefer) that will trigger a method to be executed once after properties have been set (if any).

You can also mark a property as @Required . . . With regards to constructor injection, I'm not sure exactly what problem you're facing. . . (its been a while since I used Spring).

Here's the API docs

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