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I have a function prototype like

test(something &)

and i am doing

something *ss = new something();

and i say

test(ss)

compiler complains saying initialization of reference of type something& from expression something * .

but isn't that new returns the address and ss must point to that address ! so if test is expecting a reference is not it ss represents a reference ?

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3 Answers 3

Your function expects a normal something object. You don't need to use a pointer here:

something ss;

test(ss);

When your function signature looks like f(T&), it means that it accepts a reference to a T object. When the signature is f(T*), it means that it accepts a pointer to a T object.

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Your function expects a reference to something, and you are passing it a pointer to something. You need to de-reference the pointer:

test(*ss);

That way the function takes a reference to the object pointed at by ss. If you had a something object, you could pass that directly to:

something sss;
test(sss); // test takes a reference to the sss object.
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can you please explain me y we have to do this as ss already contains a address and test also expects an address –  bana Feb 12 '13 at 0:34
    
@bana because a reference is not a pointer. A reference to a type T, say T&, is like an alias for an object of that type. If your function expected a pointer, then you could pass the address of a something object, or the ss pointer itself. –  juanchopanza Feb 12 '13 at 0:36
    
@bana: test does not expect an address. Addresses are stored in pointers. So if test expected an address, its declaration would look like this: void test(something*); –  Benjamin Lindley Feb 12 '13 at 0:46
    
You can see a reference as a "pointer which is sure not to be NULL". This may help you to understand. –  Offirmo Jun 13 '13 at 12:13

you are confused by reference and address of variable.

If your function prototype is:

test(something &)

You could call it with something object:

something ss;
test(ss);

You could call it with something pointer:

 something *ss = new something();
 test(*ss);

If your function is:

test(something *)

You could call:

something *ss = new something();
test(ss);
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