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I'm trying to come up with an algorithm that recursively calls the merge sort function using the same parameters as the qsort function that is defined in the C library. However, although my values print out, they are not in order. Can somebody take a look at my function and tell me how to correct this? I'm also including the compare function that i used. thanks in advance

  int cmp (const void *first, const void *second)
    {  
        if (first < second)
            return -1;
        else if (first > second)
            return 1;
        else
            return 0;
    }



    static void msort (void *b,size_t n,size_t s, int(*cmp)(const void*,const void*) )

    {
        char *tmp;

        void *t;
        if ((t = malloc(s*n)) == NULL)
        {
            printf("\nError: No Memory.");
            return;
        }   
        char *b1, *b2;
        size_t n1, n2;



        n1 = n / 2;
        n2 = n - n1;
        b1 = b;
        b2 = (char *) b + (n1 * s);

        if (n2 <= n1)
            return;

        msort (b1, n2, s, cmp);
        msort (b2, n1+1, s, cmp);

        tmp = t;

        while (n1 > 0 && n2 > 0)
        {
            if ((*cmp) (b1, b2) <= 0)
            {
                memcpy (tmp, b1, s);
                tmp += s;
                b1 += s;
                --n1;
            }
            else
            {
                memcpy (tmp, b2, s);
                tmp += s;
                b2 += s;
                --n2;
            }
        }
        if (n1 > 0)
            memcpy (tmp, b1, n1 * s);
        memcpy (b, t, (n - n2) * s);
    } 

here's my main. i left out some functions that you see here.

int main()
{
    int n;
    int *a, *b, *c;

printf("enter n: ");
if(scanf("%d", &n) != 1 || n < 10)
{
    fprintf(stderr, "bad input.  goodbye\n");
    abort();
}

printf("sizeof(double) %d\n", sizeof(double) );

printf("running experiments with n=%d\n", n);

a = gen_int_array(n, 5000);
//b = clone_int_array(a, n);
c = clone_int_array(a, n);


//ssort(a, n);
//isort(b, n);
//msort_int(c, n);

//msort_int(d, n);
msort (c, n, sizeof(int), cmp );



if(n<50)
dump_int_array(c, n);

free(a);
free(b );
free(c);

}

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by AAA, Alexey Frunze, EdChum, fschmengler, Laurent Etiemble Feb 12 '13 at 10:16

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
"Look at my code and correct it" - the definition of "too localized," voting to close. –  AAA Feb 12 '13 at 3:05
    
Do you have a specific question? –  Code-Apprentice Feb 12 '13 at 3:18
    
I'm trying to get suggestions on how to correct my merge sort function and make the values print out in order. you guys are acting like I'm asking you to write the whole code for me. I'm not. I did this myself, but I've been struggling to get my values in ascending order since this past friday. I'm at a blank –  Mike Smith Feb 12 '13 at 3:24

1 Answer 1

One problem is your compare function; it is comparing the two pointers, that's all — not the values that are pointed at. Since you don't show us the definition of the array that you're merge sorting, we can't easily help much more. However, supposing that you're sorting an array of int, then the comparator might be:

int comparator(void const *v1, void const *v2)
{
    int i1 = *(int *)v1;
    int i2 = *(int *)v2;
    if (i1 < i2)
        return -1;
    else if (i1 > i2)
        return +1;
    else
        return 0;
}

Note that this formulation avoids arithmetic overflow and other such undefined behaviour. It is also a decent template for comparing structures and other more complex values; you can add more of the pairs of < and > tests until you've no more criteria for separating two values.

We can also observe that there's definitively a memory leak in your code. You allocate an array inside the function, but you do not release it or return a pointer to it.


SSCCE with original msort() and comparator()

An SSCCE is a Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

static int comparator(void const *v1, void const *v2)
{
    int i1 = *(int *)v1;
    int i2 = *(int *)v2;
    if (i1 < i2)
        return -1;
    else if (i1 > i2)
        return +1;
    else
        return 0;
}

static void sort_check(int *array, size_t n)
{
    size_t fail = 0;

    for (size_t i = 1; i < n; i++)
    {
        if (array[i-1] > array[i])
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "Elements %zu (value %d) and %zu (value %d) are out of order\n",
                    i-1, array[i-1], i, array[i]);
            fail++;
        }
    }
    if (fail != 0)
        exit(1);
}

static void msort(void *b, size_t n, size_t s, int(*cmp)(const void*, const void*) )
{
    char *tmp;
    void *t;

    if ((t = malloc(s*n)) == NULL)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error: No Memory.\n");
        return;
    }

    char *b1, *b2;
    size_t n1, n2;

    n1 = n / 2;
    n2 = n - n1;
    b1 = b;
    b2 = (char *) b + (n1 * s);

    if (n2 <= n1)
        return;

    msort (b1, n2, s, cmp);
    msort (b2, n1+1, s, cmp);

    tmp = t;

    while (n1 > 0 && n2 > 0)
    {
        if ((*cmp) (b1, b2) <= 0)
        {
            memcpy (tmp, b1, s);
            tmp += s;
            b1 += s;
            --n1;
        }
        else
        {
            memcpy (tmp, b2, s);
            tmp += s;
            b2 += s;
            --n2;
        }
    }
    if (n1 > 0)
        memcpy (tmp, b1, n1 * s);
    memcpy (b, t, (n - n2) * s);
}

static int *gen_int_array(size_t n, int max_val)
{
    int *a = malloc(n * sizeof(*a));
    if (a == 0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Out of memory.\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++)
        a[i] = rand() % max_val;
    return(a);
}

static int *clone_int_array(int *master, size_t n)
{
    int *a = malloc(n * sizeof(*a));
    if (a == 0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Out of memory.\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++)
        a[i] = master[i];
    return(a);
}

static void dump_array(FILE *fp, char const *tag, int *a, size_t n)
{
    char const *pad = "";
    fprintf(fp, "Array: %s (size %zu)\n", tag, n);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        fprintf(fp, "%s%d", pad, a[i]);
        pad = ",";
    }
    putc('\n', fp);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int n;
    int *a, *b;

    if (argc == 1)
        n = 10;
    else
        n = atoi(argv[1]);
    if (n <= 0)
        n = 10;

    printf("running experiments with n = %d\n", n);

    a = gen_int_array(n, 5000);
    b = clone_int_array(a, n);

    dump_array(stdout, "Unsorted", a, n);

    printf("Q-Sort\n");
    qsort(a, n, sizeof(int), comparator);
    dump_array(stdout, "Q-sorted", a, n);
    sort_check(a, n);

    printf("M-Sort\n");
    msort(b, n, sizeof(int), comparator);
    dump_array(stdout, "M-sorted", b, n);
    sort_check(b, n);

    free(a);
    free(b);

    return(0);
}

The output for this (with no arguments, on Mac OS X 10.7.5) is:

running experiments with n = 10
Array: Unsorted (size 10)
1807,249,73,3658,3930,1272,2544,878,2923,2709
Q-Sort
Array: Q-sorted (size 10)
73,249,878,1272,1807,2544,2709,2923,3658,3930
M-Sort
Array: M-sorted (size 10)
1807,249,73,3658,3930,1272,2544,878,2923,2709
Elements 0 (value 1807) and 1 (value 249) are out of order
Elements 1 (value 249) and 2 (value 73) are out of order
Elements 4 (value 3930) and 5 (value 1272) are out of order
Elements 6 (value 2544) and 7 (value 878) are out of order
Elements 8 (value 2923) and 9 (value 2709) are out of order

As you can see, the qsort() gets the data in the correct order. The msort() does not change the order of anything. The test harness isn't set up to manage 0 rows of data, but running msort 1 gets a core dump from the msort() function. It's always a bad sign when a degenerate case fails with a segmentation fault.

The size 1 problem (and size 0) is fixed by checking n on entry to msort() and returning if n <= 1.

The next problem is the condition where if (n2 <= n1); it returns early. Indeed, that condition always fires for an even value of n; when you start with an odd value of n, the recursion generates an even value, and the early return kicks in. Thus, the sorting never happens. This is the (partially) instrumented version of the function that demonstrates this behaviour:

static void msort(void *b, size_t n, size_t s, int (*cmp)(const void *v1, const void *v2) )
{
    if (n <= 1)
        return;     /* Already sorted */

    printf("-->> msort(%zu)\n", n);
    void *t = malloc(s*n);

    if (t == NULL)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error: No Memory.\n");
        printf("<<-- msort(%zu)\n", n);
        return;
    }

    size_t n1 = n / 2;
    size_t n2 = n - n1;

    if (n2 <= n1)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Oops: %zu <= %zu\n", n2, n1);
        free(t);
        printf("<<-- msort(%zu)\n", n);
        return;
    }

    char *b1 = b;
    char *b2 = (char *) b + (n1 * s);

    msort(b1, n2, s, cmp);
    msort(b2, n1+1, s, cmp);

    char *tmp = t;

    while (n1 > 0 && n2 > 0)
    {
        if ((*cmp)(b1, b2) <= 0)
        {
            memcpy(tmp, b1, s);
            tmp += s;
            b1 += s;
            --n1;
        }
        else
        {
            memcpy(tmp, b2, s);
            tmp += s;
            b2 += s;
            --n2;
        }
    }
    if (n1 > 0)
        memcpy(tmp, b1, n1 * s);
    memcpy(b, t, (n - n2) * s);
    free(t);
    printf("<<-- msort(%zu)\n", n);
}

And sample runs:

running experiments with n = 1
Array: Unsorted (size 1)
1807
Q-Sort
Array: Q-sorted (size 1)
1807
M-Sort
Array: M-sorted (size 1)
1807

running experiments with n = 2
Array: Unsorted (size 2)
1807,249
Q-Sort
Array: Q-sorted (size 2)
249,1807
M-Sort
-->> msort(2)
Oops: 1 <= 1
<<-- msort(2)
Array: M-sorted (size 2)
1807,249
Elements 0 (value 1807) and 1 (value 249) are out of order

running experiments with n = 3
Array: Unsorted (size 3)
1807,249,73
Q-Sort
Array: Q-sorted (size 3)
73,249,1807
M-Sort
-->> msort(3)
-->> msort(2)
Oops: 1 <= 1
<<-- msort(2)
-->> msort(2)
Oops: 1 <= 1
<<-- msort(2)
<<-- msort(3)
Array: M-sorted (size 3)
249,73,1807
Elements 0 (value 249) and 1 (value 73) are out of order

running experiments with n = 4
Array: Unsorted (size 4)
1807,249,73,3658
Q-Sort
Array: Q-sorted (size 4)
73,249,1807,3658
M-Sort
-->> msort(4)
Oops: 2 <= 2
<<-- msort(4)
Array: M-sorted (size 4)
1807,249,73,3658
Elements 0 (value 1807) and 1 (value 249) are out of order
Elements 1 (value 249) and 2 (value 73) are out of order

running experiments with n = 5
Array: Unsorted (size 5)
1807,249,73,3658,3930
Q-Sort
Array: Q-sorted (size 5)
73,249,1807,3658,3930
M-Sort
-->> msort(5)
-->> msort(3)
-->> msort(2)
Oops: 1 <= 1
<<-- msort(2)
-->> msort(2)
Oops: 1 <= 1
<<-- msort(2)
<<-- msort(3)
-->> msort(3)
-->> msort(2)
Oops: 1 <= 1
<<-- msort(2)
-->> msort(2)
Oops: 1 <= 1
<<-- msort(2)
<<-- msort(3)
<<-- msort(5)
Array: M-sorted (size 5)
249,73,1807,3658,3930
Elements 0 (value 249) and 1 (value 73) are out of order

running experiments with n = 6
Array: Unsorted (size 6)
1807,249,73,3658,3930,1272
Q-Sort
Array: Q-sorted (size 6)
73,249,1272,1807,3658,3930
M-Sort
-->> msort(6)
Oops: 3 <= 3
<<-- msort(6)
Array: M-sorted (size 6)
1807,249,73,3658,3930,1272
Elements 0 (value 1807) and 1 (value 249) are out of order
Elements 1 (value 249) and 2 (value 73) are out of order
Elements 4 (value 3930) and 5 (value 1272) are out of order

It's your problem from here...I've shown some debug techniques, and diagnosed some of the problems. Note that tracking function entry and exit can be helpful (though I cheated and didn't diagnose size 0 or 1 entry/exit). Especially in recursive code, it helps a lot to identify the key parameter to the function (here, n, though the address of the start of the array might also be relevant) so that separate calls can be detected.


I got bored, or careless, or something...this code works. Changes in the recursive calls, and the cleanup at the end of the merge loop, and the copy back to the original array. And removed the dubious if (n2 <= n1) block altogether; I couldn't work out a purpose for it. Oh, and more diagnostics, print array on entry and exit.

static void msort(void *b, size_t n, size_t s, int (*cmp)(const void *v1, const void *v2) )
{
    if (n <= 1)
        return;     /* Already sorted */

    printf("-->> msort(%zu)\n", n);
    dump_array(stdout, "Entry to msort()", (int *)b, n);
    void *t = malloc(s*n);

    if (t == NULL)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error: No Memory.\n");
        printf("<<-- msort(%zu)\n", n);
        return;
    }

    size_t n1 = n / 2;
    size_t n2 = n - n1;

    char *b1 = b;
    char *b2 = (char *) b + (n1 * s);

    msort(b1, n1, s, cmp);
    msort(b2, n2, s, cmp);

    char *tmp = t;

    while (n1 > 0 && n2 > 0)
    {
        if ((*cmp)(b1, b2) <= 0)
        {
            memcpy(tmp, b1, s);
            tmp += s;
            b1 += s;
            --n1;
        }
        else
        {
            memcpy(tmp, b2, s);
            tmp += s;
            b2 += s;
            --n2;
        }
    }
    if (n1 > 0)
        memcpy(tmp, b1, n1 * s);
    else if (n2 > 0)
        memcpy(tmp, b2, n2 * s);
    memcpy(b, t, n * s);
    free(t);

    dump_array(stdout, "Exit from msort()", (int *)b, n);
    printf("<<-- msort(%zu)\n", n);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
you will have to have some idea of what you are comparing (are the ints, doubles, string, a structure, what?) Then in the cmp function you will have to dereference the pointer do the compare –  David Hope Feb 12 '13 at 3:02
    
i am sorting an array of integers, and i tried what you suggested, but my values are still printing out out of order. ive been stuck on this this whole weekend and cant rectify this. –  Mike Smith Feb 12 '13 at 3:19
    
When you're testing, don't test with 5000; test with 5! Or, rather, start off with testing with small numbers like 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 items, and when they're all working, think about moving to larger sizes. I've not studied your merge sort code itself. However, my comparator should help. You could double check that by using the system qsort() on a (copy of) your array, using the comparator, and ensuring that the data is sorted. (You need the sort-check function for your own work too, of course.) That will give you confidence that the comparator is correct. Then you can debug your sort code. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 12 '13 at 3:26
    
Incidentally, it is a very bad idea to try printing an array after you've freed it. When you free the memory, you promise not to read from or write to that memory again. It is also bad practice to post non-compiling code — you're sorting an array d which is not declared. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 12 '13 at 3:37
1  
@ACB: dump_int_array() isn't a standard function, so yes, it is Mike's. It's faintly similar to my dump_array() without the option to specify the output file or a tag. I find those too useful to forego; I routinely write a dump_XXXX() function for any structure, and it includes the file stream and tag to make it easy to reuse, report errors, print progress reports, etc. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 12 '13 at 4:13

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