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xrange function doesn't work for large integers:

>>> N = 10**100
>>> xrange(N)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
OverflowError: long int too large to convert to int
>>> xrange(N, N+10)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
OverflowError: long int too large to convert to int

Python 3.x:

>>> N = 10**100
>>> r = range(N)
>>> r = range(N, N+10)
>>> len(r)
10

Is there a backport of py3k builtin range() function for Python 2.x?

Edit

I'm looking for a complete implementation of "lazy" range(), not just a partial implementation of some of its functionality.

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Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/2187135/… –  J.F. Sebastian Feb 28 '10 at 2:17
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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Okay, here's a go at a fuller reimplementation.

class MyXRange(object):
    def __init__(self, a1, a2=None, step=1):
        if step == 0:
            raise ValueError("arg 3 must not be 0")
        if a2 is None:
            a1, a2 = 0, a1
        if (a2 - a1) % step != 0:
            a2 += step - (a2 - a1) % step
        if cmp(a1, a2) != cmp(0, step):
            a2 = a1
        self.start, self.stop, self.step = a1, a2, step

    def __iter__(self):
        n = self.start
        while cmp(n, self.stop) == cmp(0, self.step):
            yield n
            n += self.step

    def __repr__(self):
        return "MyXRange(%d,%d,%d)" % (self.start, self.stop, self.step)

    # NB: len(self) will convert this to an int, and may fail
    def __len__(self):
        return (self.stop - self.start)//(self.step)

    def __getitem__(self, key):
        if key < 0:
            key = self.__len__() + key
            if key < 0:
                raise IndexError("list index out of range")
            return self[key]
        n = self.start + self.step*key
        if cmp(n, self.stop) != cmp(0, self.step):
            raise IndexError("list index out of range")
        return n

    def __reversed__(self):
        return MyXRange(self.stop-self.step, self.start-self.step, -self.step)

    def __contains__(self, val):
        if val == self.start: return cmp(0, self.step) == cmp(self.start, self.stop)
        if cmp(self.start, val) != cmp(0, self.step): return False
        if cmp(val, self.stop) != cmp(0, self.step): return False
        return (val - self.start) % self.step == 0

And some testing:

def testMyXRange(testsize=10):
    def normexcept(f,args):
        try:
            r = [f(args)]
        except Exception, e:
            r = type(e)
        return r

    for i in range(-testsize,testsize+1):
        for j in range(-testsize,testsize+1):
            print i, j
            for k in range(-9, 10, 2):
                r, mr = range(i,j,k), MyXRange(i,j,k)

                if r != list(mr):
                    print "iter fail: %d, %d, %d" % (i,j,k)

                if list(reversed(r)) != list(reversed(mr)):
                    print "reversed fail: %d, %d, %d" % (i,j,k)

                if len(r) != len(mr):
                    print "len fail: %d, %d, %d" % (i,j,k)

                z = [m for m in range(-testsize*2,testsize*2+1)
                      if (m in r) != (m in mr)]
                if z != []:
                    print "contains fail: %d, %d, %d, %s" % (i,j,k,(z+["..."])[:10])

                z = [m for m in range(-testsize*2, testsize*2+1) 
                      if normexcept(r.__getitem__, m) != normexcept(mr.__getitem__, m)]
                if z != []:
                    print "getitem fail: %d, %d, %d, %s" % (i,j,k,(z+["..."])[:10])
share|improve this answer
    
Your __reversed__ is incorrect - the reverse of xrange(0, 10, 3) is not equal to xrange(10 - 3, 0 - 3, -3) –  Chris Lutz Sep 27 '09 at 3:20
    
Nevermind, apparently it's not. Python seems to agree with you, although I believe that this behavior is rather counter intuitive and I'm not sure why it would be useful for it to be that way. –  Chris Lutz Sep 27 '09 at 3:39
    
range(0,4,2) = [0,2] reversed(range(0,4,2)) = [2,0] = range(2, -2, -2) (Assuming you've extended "stop" to be the next multiple of step above, then range(start, stop, step) includes start and doesn't incude stop; so you just have to manage the offset when converting to range(stop, start, -step). Of course, real range/xrange don't simplify that any further anyway, so whatever) –  Anthony Towns Sep 27 '09 at 3:55
    
This works, but it doesn't work on an example where (start - stop) / step is not an integer: range(0, 10, 3) = [0, 3, 6, 9]; reversed(range(0, 10, 3)) = [9, 6, 3, 0] = range(9, -3, -3) –  Chris Lutz Sep 27 '09 at 4:43
    
MyXRange passes relevant parts of my tests ( stackoverflow.com/questions/1482480/… ). –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 27 '09 at 4:48
show 2 more comments

I believe there is no backport (Py 3's completely removed the int/long distinction, after all, but in 2.* it's here to stay;-) but it's not hard to hack your own, e.g....:

import operator

def wowrange(start, stop, step=1):
  if step == 0:
    raise ValueError('step must be != 0')
  elif step < 0:
    proceed = operator.gt
  else:
    proceed = operator.lt
  while proceed(start, stop):
    yield start
    start += step

Edit it appears the OP doesn't just want looping (the normal purpose of xrange, and range in Py3), but also len and the in operator (the latter does work on the above generator, but slowly -- optimizations are possible). For such richness a class is better...:

import operator

class wowrange(object):
  def __init__(self, start, stop=None, step=1):
    if step == 0: raise ValueError('step must be != 0')
    if stop is None: start, stop = 0, start
    if step < 0:
      self.proceed = operator.gt
      self.l = (stop-start+step+1)//step
    else:
      self.proceed = operator.lt
      self.l = (stop-start+step-1)//step
    self.lo = min(start, stop)
    self.start, self.stop, self.step = start, stop, step
  def __iter__(self):
    start = self.start
    while self.proceed(start, self.stop):
      yield start
      start += self.step
  def __len__(self):
    return self.l
  def __contains__(self, x):
    if x == self.stop:
      return False
    if self.proceed(x, self.start):
      return False
    if self.proceed(self.stop, x):
      return False
    return (x-self.lo) % self.step == 0

I wouldn't be surprised if there's an off-by-one or similar glitch lurking here, but, I hope this helps!

Edit again: I see indexing is ALSO required. Is it just too hard to write your own __getitem__? I guess it is, so here it, too, is, served on a silver plate...:

 def __getitem__(self, i):
   if i < 0:
     i += self.l
     if i < 0: raise IndexError
   elif if i >= self.l:
     raise IndexError
   return self.start + i * self.step

I don't know if 3.0 range supports slicing (xrange in recent 2.* releases doesn't -- it used to, but that was removed because the complication was ridiculous and prone to bugs), but I guess I do have to draw a line in the sand somewhere, so I'm not going to add it;-).

share|improve this answer
    
I'd like to have such niceties as something in range(), len(range()), etc. In other words I need xrange that works with large integers (py3k is exactly that). –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 27 '09 at 0:51
    
something in wowrange will work (slowly, i.e., O(N)), though len won't -- easy to make a class with them though, let me edit the answer. –  Alex Martelli Sep 27 '09 at 1:23
    
Why raise ValueError('step must be > 0') when step can be less than 0 just as easily as it can be greater? –  Chris Lutz Sep 27 '09 at 2:05
    
Oops, I meant != 0 in hte second version just like I had in the first, let me edit and fix ("easily" my foot -- half the complication in this code is to support the < 0 case -- but I know what you mean;-). –  Alex Martelli Sep 27 '09 at 2:10
    
len(wowrange(..)) triggers ValueError: __len__() should return >= 0 on my tests ( see test_irange.py in my answer stackoverflow.com/questions/1482480/… ) –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 27 '09 at 4:39
show 3 more comments

From the docs:

Note

xrange() is intended to be simple and fast. Implementations may impose restrictions to achieve this. The C implementation of Python restricts all arguments to native C longs (“short” Python integers), and also requires that the number of elements fit in a native C long. If a larger range is needed, an alternate version can be crafted using the itertools module: islice(count(start, step), (stop-start+step-1)//step).

Alternatively reimplement xrange using generators:

def myxrange(a1, a2=None, step=1):
    if a2 is None:
        start, last = 0, a1
    else:
        start, last = a1, a2
    while cmp(start, last) == cmp(0, step):
        yield start
        start += step

and

N = 10**100
len(list(myxrange(N, N+10)))
share|improve this answer
1  
Aha, you fell into a typical trap -- infinite loop for step <= 0 (note how carefully in my answer, which I wrote before seeing yours, I pick the right comparison operator, and raise for step == 0). The cool islice version would at least raise for step <= 0. I thought about supporting single-argument range, as you do, but I doubt it's useful to loop from 0 to above sys.maxint, so I skipped that (as the cool islice version does). –  Alex Martelli Sep 27 '09 at 0:45
1  
Wow, how embarrassing. Fixed. –  Anthony Towns Sep 27 '09 at 0:50
    
This won't work for myxrange(N)[N-2], for example. I've edited my question to clarify that. –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 27 '09 at 1:07
add comment

Edit

Issue 1546078: "xrange that supports longs, etc" on the Python issue tracker contains C patch and pure Python implementation of unlimited xrange written by Neal Norwitz (nnorwitz). See xrange.py

Edit

The latest version of irange (renamed as lrange) is at github.


Implementation based on py3k's rangeobject.c

irange.py

"""Define `irange.irange` class

`xrange`, py3k's `range` analog for large integers

See help(irange.irange)

>>> r = irange(2**100, 2**101, 2**100)
>>> len(r)
1
>>> for i in r:
...     print i,
1267650600228229401496703205376
>>> for i in r:
...     print i,
1267650600228229401496703205376
>>> 2**100 in r
True
>>> r[0], r[-1]
(1267650600228229401496703205376L, 1267650600228229401496703205376L)
>>> L = list(r)
>>> L2 = [1, 2, 3]
>>> L2[:] = r
>>> L == L2 == [2**100]
True
"""


def toindex(arg): 
    """Convert `arg` to integer type that could be used as an index.

    """
    if not any(isinstance(arg, cls) for cls in (long, int, bool)):
        raise TypeError("'%s' object cannot be interpreted as an integer" % (
            type(arg).__name__,))
    return int(arg)


class irange(object):
    """irange([start,] stop[, step]) -> irange object

    Return an iterator that generates the numbers in the range on demand.
    Return `xrange` for small integers 

    Pure Python implementation of py3k's `range()`.

    (I.e. it supports large integers)

    If `xrange` and py3k `range()` differ then prefer `xrange`'s behaviour

    Based on `[1]`_

    .. [1] http://svn.python.org/view/python/branches/py3k/Objects/rangeobject.c?view=markup

    >>> # on Python 2.6
    >>> N = 10**80
    >>> len(range(N, N+3))
    3
    >>> len(xrange(N, N+3))
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    ...
    OverflowError: long int too large to convert to int
    >>> len(irange(N, N+3))
    3
    >>> xrange(N)
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    ...
    OverflowError: long int too large to convert to int
    >>> irange(N).length() == N
    True
    """
    def __new__(cls, *args):
        try: return xrange(*args) # use `xrange` for small integers
        except OverflowError: pass

        nargs = len(args)
        if nargs == 1:
            stop = toindex(args[0])
            start = 0
            step = 1
        elif nargs in (2, 3):
            start = toindex(args[0]) 
            stop = toindex(args[1])
            if nargs == 3:
                step = args[2]
                if step is None: 
                    step = 1

                step = toindex(step)
                if step == 0:
                    raise ValueError("irange() arg 3 must not be zero")
            else:
                step = 1
        else:
            raise ValueError("irange(): wrong number of arguments," +
                             " got %s" % args)

        r = super(irange, cls).__new__(cls)
        r._start, r._stop, r._step = start, stop, step
        return r

    def length(self):
        """len(self) might throw OverflowError, this method shouldn't."""
        if self._step > 0:
            lo, hi = self._start, self._stop
            step = self._step
        else:
            hi, lo = self._start, self._stop
            step = -self._step
            assert step

        if lo >= hi:
            return 0
        else:
            return (hi - lo - 1) // step + 1

    __len__ = length

    def __getitem__(self, i): # for L[:] = irange(..)
        if i < 0:
            i = i + self.length() 
        if i < 0 or i >= self.length():
            raise IndexError("irange object index out of range")

        return self._start + i * self._step

    def __repr__(self):
        if self._step == 1:
            return "irange(%r, %r)" % (self._start, self._stop)
        else:

            return "irange(%r, %r, %r)" % (
                self._start, self._stop, self._step)

    def __contains__(self, ob):
        if type(ob) not in (int, long, bool): # mimic py3k
            # perform iterative search
            return any(i == ob for i in self)

        # if long or bool
        if self._step > 0:
            inrange = self._start <= ob < self._stop
        else:
            assert self._step
            inrange = self._stop < ob <= self._start

        if not inrange:
            return False
        else:
            return ((ob - self._start) % self._step) == 0

    def __iter__(self):
        len_ = self.length()
        i = 0
        while i < len_:
            yield self._start + i * self._step
            i += 1

    def __reversed__(self):
        len_ = self.length()
        new_start = self._start + (len_ - 1) * self._step
        new_stop = self._start
        if self._step > 0:
            new_stop -= 1
        else:
            new_stop += 1
        return irange(new_start, new_stop, -self._step)

test_irange.py

"""Unit-tests for irange.irange class.

Usage:

    $ python -W error test_irange.py --with-doctest --doctest-tests
"""
import sys

from nose.tools import raises

from irange import irange


def eq_irange(a, b):
    """Assert that `a` equals `b`.

    Where `a`, `b` are `irange` objects
    """
    try:
        assert a.length() == b.length()
        assert a._start == b._start
        assert a._stop == b._stop
        assert a._step == b._step
        if a.length() < 100:
            assert list(a) == list(b)
            try:
                 assert list(a) == range(a._start, a._stop, a._step)
            except OverflowError:
                pass
    except AttributeError:
        if type(a) == xrange:
            assert len(a) == len(b)
            if len(a) == 0: # empty xrange
                return
            if len(a) > 0:
                assert a[0] == b[0]
            if len(a) > 1:
                a = irange(a[0], a[-1], a[1] - a[0])
                b = irange(b[0], b[-1], b[1] - b[0])
                eq_irange(a, b)
        else:
            raise


def _get_short_iranges_args():
    # perl -E'local $,= q/ /; $n=100; for (1..20)
    # >    { say map {int(-$n + 2*$n*rand)} 0..int(3*rand) }'
    input_args = """\
    67
    -11
    51
    -36
    -15 38 19
    43 -58 79
    -91 -71
    -56
    3 51
    -23 -63
    -80 13 -30
    24
    -14 49
    10 73
    31
    38 66
    -22 20 -81
    79 5 84
    44
    40 49
    """
    return [[int(arg) for arg in line.split()]
            for line in input_args.splitlines() if line.strip()]


def _get_iranges_args():
    N = 2**100
    return [(start, stop, step)
            for start in range(-2*N, 2*N, N//2+1)
            for stop in range(-4*N, 10*N, N+1)
            for step in range(-N//2, N, N//8+1)]



def _get_short_iranges():
    return [irange(*args) for args in _get_short_iranges_args()]


def _get_iranges():
    return (_get_short_iranges() +
            [irange(*args) for args in _get_iranges_args()])


@raises(TypeError)
def test_kwarg():
    irange(stop=10)


@raises(TypeError, DeprecationWarning)
def test_float_stop():
    irange(1.0)


@raises(TypeError, DeprecationWarning)
def test_float_step2():
    irange(-1, 2, 1.0)


@raises(TypeError, DeprecationWarning)
def test_float_start():
    irange(1.0, 2)


@raises(TypeError, DeprecationWarning)
def test_float_step():
    irange(1, 2, 1.0)


@raises(TypeError)
def test_empty_args():
    irange()


def test_empty_range():
    for args in (
        "-3",
        "1 3 -1",
        "1 1",
        "1 1 1",
        "-3 -4",
        "-3 -2 -1",
        "-3 -3 -1",
        "-3 -3",
        ):
        r = irange(*[int(a) for a in args.split()])
        assert len(r) == 0
        L = list(r)
        assert len(L) == 0


def test_small_ints():
    for args in _get_short_iranges_args():
        ir, r = irange(*args), xrange(*args)
        assert len(ir) == len(r)
        assert list(ir) == list(r)


def test_big_ints():
    N = 10**100
    for args, len_ in [
        [(N,), N],
        [(N, N+10), 10],
        [(N, N-10, -2), 5],
        ]:
        try:
            xrange(*args)
            assert 0
        except OverflowError:
            pass

        ir = irange(*args)
        assert ir.length() == len_
        try:
            assert ir.length() == len(ir)
        except OverflowError:
            pass
        #
        ir[ir.length()-1]
        #
        if len(args) >= 2:
            r = range(*args)
            assert list(ir) == r
            assert ir[ir.length()-1] == r[-1]
            assert list(reversed(ir)) == list(reversed(r))
        #


def test_negative_index():
    assert irange(10)[-1] == 9
    assert irange(2**100+1)[-1] == 2**100


def test_reversed():
    for r in _get_iranges():
        if type(r) == xrange: continue # known not to work for xrange
        if r.length() > 1000: continue # skip long
        assert list(reversed(reversed(r))) == list(r)
        assert list(r) == range(r._start, r._stop, r._step)


def test_pickle():
    import pickle
    for r in _get_iranges():
        rp = pickle.loads(pickle.dumps(r))
        eq_irange(rp, r)


def test_equility():
    for args in _get_iranges_args():
        a, b = irange(*args), irange(*args)
        assert a is not b
        assert a != b 
        eq_irange(a, b)


def test_contains():
    class IntSubclass(int):
        pass

    r10 = irange(10)
    for i in range(10):
        assert i in r10
        assert IntSubclass(i) in r10

    assert 10 not in r10
    assert -1 not in r10
    assert IntSubclass(10) not in r10
    assert IntSubclass(-1) not in r10


def test_repr():
    for r in _get_iranges():
        eq_irange(eval(repr(r)), r)


def test_new():
    assert repr(irange(True)) == repr(irange(1))


def test_overflow():
    lo, hi = sys.maxint-2, sys.maxint+3
    assert list(irange(lo, hi)) == list(range(lo, hi))


def test_getitem():
    r = irange(sys.maxint-2, sys.maxint+3)
    L = []
    L[:] = r
    assert len(L) == len(r)
    assert L == list(r)


if __name__ == "__main__":
    import nose 
    nose.main()
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Even if there was a backport, it would probably have to be modified. The underlying problem here is that in Python 2.x int and long are separate data types, even though ints get automatically upcast to longs as necessary. However, this doesn't necessarily happen in functions written in C, depending on how they're written.

share|improve this answer
1  
Current version of range function for py3k also has two different implementation: for long integers (objects) and plain integer (C POD). –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 27 '09 at 0:53
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