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not quite understanding factory method here... here is the respec line:

Temperature.from_celsius(50).in_celsius.should == 50

Here is what I have now:

getting errors...not quite sure how to satisfy this. thanks

class Temperature
attr_accessor :f
attr_accessor :c   

   def initialize(args)
     @f = args[:f]
     @c = args[:c]
   end

  def in_fahrenheit
     @f or
    (@c*9.0/5.0)+32 
  end

  def in_celsius

   @c or
  (@f-32)*(5.0/9.0)
   end

   def self.from_celsius(c)
    new c
    end


   end
share|improve this question
    
Can you post what errors you are getting? – Cody A. Ray Feb 12 '13 at 3:40
    
ArgumentError: wrong number of arguments (0 for 1) – Justin Phillip Feb 12 '13 at 3:43
    
It looks like you're confusing class and instance methods here, but it's hard to tell. Could you reformat the code so that it is more readable? – zetetic Feb 12 '13 at 3:44

This should help

class Temperature
  def initialize c
    @c = c
  end

  def in_celsius
    @c
  end

  def in_fahrenheit
    @c *9.0 /5.0 +32
  end

  # factory pattern typically instantiates a new object
  def self.from_celsius(c)
    new c
  end
end

puts Temperature.from_celsius(50).in_celsius      #=> 50
puts Temperature.from_celsius(100).in_fahrenheit  #=> 212

I would recommend against attr_accessor :c unless you want users to have public access to temp.c. Without it, users will be forced to use temp.in_celsius or temp.in_fahrenheit

share|improve this answer
    
I'm getting: TypeError: can't convert Symbol into Integer – Justin Phillip Feb 12 '13 at 3:56
    
What are you trying to run through it? The code in my post runs in ruby 1.8.7 through 1.9.3 – maček Feb 12 '13 at 4:00
    
    
i've edited my complete code on my post – Justin Phillip Feb 12 '13 at 4:01

You need to assign to :c in the initialize method. Then you need self.from_celsius to return a new instance of Temperature. You probably want something like this:

class Temperature
  attr_accessor :c
  def initialize c
    @c = c
  end

  def in_celsius
    @c
  end

  def in_fahrenheit
    9/5 * @c + 32
  end

  def self.from_celsius(num)
    Temperature.new(num)
  end

  def self.from_fahrenheit(num)
    Temperature.new((num-32)*5/9)
  end
end

Now rspec shows true

1.9.1p378 :047 > Temperature.from_celsius(50).in_celsius.should == 50
 => true 
1.9.1p378 :131 > Temperature.from_fahrenheit(32).in_celsius.should == 0
 => true 
share|improve this answer
    
i wonder whys thats now working on my end....im getting an error: Can't covert symbol to integer – Justin Phillip Feb 12 '13 at 4:45
    
What version of ruby are you using? – Cody A. Ray Feb 12 '13 at 4:47
    
1.8.7....also this is the practice i'm trying to tackle...testfirst.org/live/learn_ruby/temperature_object. i've updated my code to exactly what i have – Justin Phillip Feb 12 '13 at 4:52

The reason you're getting "error: Can't covert symbol to integer –" is because you're in your Temperature.from_celsius(50) you're passing it an integer when you're supposed to pass it a key & symbol for the options hash.

initialized

class Temperature
  def initialize(opts = {})
    @options = opts
  end

class factory method

def self.from_celsius(x)
    Temperature.new(:c => x)
end

instance method

def in_celsius
    if @options[:c] == nil
      return (@options[:f]-32) * (5/9.to_f)
    else
      return @options[:c]
  end
end
share|improve this answer

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