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I'm having some trouble with a query. I'm supposed to pull up all the client info where the client has only taken 1 test and passed. I was told to use the IN operator. This is what I have:

SELECT *
  FROM Client
 WHERE ClientName IN (SELECT ClientName, COUNT(TestNbr)
                        FROM Test
                    GROUP BY ClientName, TestResult
                      HAVING COUNT(TestNbr)=1
                         AND TestResult='Pass');

I get this error:

(SELECT ClientName, COUNT(TestNbr)
 *
ERROR at line 4: 
ORA-00913: too many values

I understand that it's because I shouldn't have any other entry except for ClientName in that line. How can I fix this problem?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

remove the COUNT(*) column on the subquery as it is not neccesary on the result,

SELECT  *
FROM    Client
WHERE   ClientName IN
        (
            SELECT  ClientName
            FROM    Test
            GROUP   BY ClientName, TestResult
            HAVING  COUNT(TestNbr) = 1 AND TestResult='Pass'
        );

but I'd rather use JOIN instead of using IN

SELECT  DISTINCT a.*
FROM    Client a
        INNER JOIN
        (
            SELECT  ClientName
            FROM    Test
            GROUP   BY ClientName, TestResult
            HAVING  COUNT(TestNbr) = 1 AND TestResult='Pass'
        ) b ON a.ClientName = b.ClientName

for faster performance, add an index on column ClientName on both tables.

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Thanks! That worked –  Cyrallia Feb 12 '13 at 5:15
    
you're welcome :D I have updated the answer. –  John Woo Feb 12 '13 at 5:17
1  
Not sure I buy the inline view here as you're not using any fields from it. Also I think I would move the testresult='Pass' from the having put it in the where and remove testresult from the group by –  Conrad Frix Feb 12 '13 at 5:20
    
I agree with Conrad -- HAVING is for aggregate function use. It supports non-aggregate functionality, doesn't mean it should be used. –  OMG Ponies Feb 12 '13 at 5:21

An IN clause can only contain one column if a sub-query is used. You should remove the COUNT from the columns selected if it's a problem.

What you might want to do is make a VIEW that represents the sub-query and then JOIN against that.

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There's no benefit to making a non-materialized view. If anything, the encapsulation is bad and predicate pushing might not occur. –  OMG Ponies Feb 12 '13 at 5:20
    
I've always preferred SELECT ClientName FROM ClientsWithPassingTestResults to SELECT ClientName FROM... and a considerable mess of SQL. Maybe it's just me. –  tadman Feb 12 '13 at 5:26
    
Performance trumps preference. –  OMG Ponies Feb 12 '13 at 5:28

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