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I tried to do the following in Django 1.4.3:

class The_Image_Abstract(models.Model):
    create_time = models.DateTimeField()
    class Meta:
        abstract = True

class Imager(The_Image_Abstract):
    time2 = models.DateTimeField()

class ImagerB(Imager):
    time3 = models.DateTimeField()

but the create_time field doesn't show up as a field in ImagerB when doing syncdb. Any ideas how it can show up? Otherwise I will have to repeat a whole bunch of things from Imager in ImagerB.

Thanks,

Eras

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2 Answers 2

Assuming that you don't have any additional fields on Imager or ImagerB then you could use proxy models.

This allows you to keep one db table for the base class and have Imager and ImagerB share the data - it really works like proper Object Orientated Inheritance. The issue is that you can't have additional fields on the child classes. However if you've got a bit of flexibility, then you could make the fields optional on the base class then require or hide them on the children.

UPDATE

I still haven't managed to get the following code to work, however it might provide some ideas.

class TheImage(models.Model):
    create_time = models.DateTimeField()
    field2 = models.CharField(max_length=64, blank=True, null=True)
    field3 = models.TextField(blank=True, null=True)

class Imager(TheImage):
    class Meta:
        proxy = True

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        for f in self._meta.fields:
            if f.name == 'field2':
                f.editable = False
            if f.name == 'field3':
                f.blank = False:
        super(Imager, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

class ImagerB(TheImage):
    class Meta:
        proxy = True

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        for f in self._meta.fields:
            if f.name == 'field3':
                f.editable = False
            if f.name == 'field2':
                f.blank = False:
        super(ImagerB, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
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This is very interesting. Let me try it and I will post the results. –  Seperman Feb 13 '13 at 0:42

It will show in Imager table not ImagerB.

Imager inherits from abstract class The_Image_Abstract, but it has its own table. While ImagerB inherits from non-abstract class Imager, so fields in Imager put in table of Imager.

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So what is the point of subclassing Imager then? I wanted to adhere to DRY by subclassing and subclassing again to make ImagerB more specialized version of Imager. Now I have to repeat a whole bunch of things that were in Imager again in ImagerB if I go with ImagerB(The_Image_Abstract) –  Seperman Feb 12 '13 at 6:13
    
You can still do that, django will give you ImagerB objects that have fields from Imager, but internally it will create different tables. Hope you have read this docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/db/models/… –  Rohan Feb 12 '13 at 8:08
    
My problem as you said is that the fields that are defined in Imager show up in ImagerB but the fields that were in the abstract base class, which were the base of Imager don't show up in ImagerB. ImagerB is useless for me without those. Basically ImagerB is supposed to be more specialized version of Imager. –  Seperman Feb 12 '13 at 18:07

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