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Howdy fellow programmers, I am learning about delegates. In my book the author claims that this method will print out the names of the method(s) maintained by a delegate object as well as the name of the class defining the method.

static void DisplayDelegateInfo(Delegate delObj)
{
 foreach (Delegate d in delObj.GetInvocationList())
{
 Console.WriteLine("Method Name: {0}", d.Method);
 Console.WriteLine("Type Name: {0}", d.Target);
}
}

The method is being used in this way.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
 Console.WriteLine("***** Simple Delegate Example *****\n");
 SimpleMath m = new SimpleMath();
 BinaryOp b = new BinaryOp(m.Add);
 DisplayDelegateInfo(b);
 Console.WriteLine("10 + 10 is {0}", b(10, 10));
 Console.ReadLine();
}

My question is, if the DisplayDelegateInfo() loops through the delObj invocation list, in which case would I see more than one item in the array? The book does not seem to give an example of this, can anyone modify the main() method in a way that would display more than one item in this array?

Appreciate any input, Thanks, Leo

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
static void Main(string[] args)
{
 Console.WriteLine("***** Simple Delegate Example *****\n");
 SimpleMath m = new SimpleMath();
 BinaryOp b = new BinaryOp(m.Add);

 // bellow 'b +=' is short for b = b + 
 b += m.Add1; // Add1 same type (signature really) as method Add

 DisplayDelegateInfo(b);
 Console.WriteLine("10 + 10 is {0}", b(10, 10));
 Console.ReadLine();
}

Copy existing method Add in the body of the class SimpleMath and rename it to Add1, to make this work. This is called multicast delegate, here is short example of the .NET C# implementation & operations available for it.

Add will remain in the delegate and while Add1 would be appended to the internal list (a FIFO queue) delegates maintain.

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Thanks, but wouldn't "b = new BinaryOp(m.Add1);" replace the m.Add() method, and therefore b still points to 1 method, Add1? –  RealityDysfunction Feb 12 '13 at 5:34
    
ops sorry, yeah you are right it will replace it! Let me modify my example –  user1416420 Feb 12 '13 at 6:17

A MultiCastDelegate, a class derived from delegate, can hold multiple delegates. The MSDN has a full working example.

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