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I have two columns in a large file, say

pro1 lig1
pro2 lig2
pro3 lig3
pro4 lig1
.....

Second is column redundant. I want new random combinations of double size which should not match given combination, for example

pro1 lig2
pro1 lig4
pro2 lig1
pro2 lig3
pro3 lig4
pro3 lig2
pro4 lig2
pro4 lig3
.....

Thanks.

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1  
how this relates to excel? –  Peter L. Feb 12 '13 at 6:18
    
I think OP doesn't care how it is solved, either with python, linux or excel. –  Thorsten Kranz Feb 12 '13 at 6:55
    
you are right @ThorstenKranz. but here python seems to be better –  SNA Feb 12 '13 at 10:47
    
Agree. Especially the community is better ;-) –  Thorsten Kranz Feb 12 '13 at 10:55
    
Agree. Thank you all =) –  SNA Feb 12 '13 at 11:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want exactly two results for each value in column one, I'd brute force the non-matching part, with something like this:

import random

def gen_random_data(inputfile):
    with open(inputfile, "r") as f:
        column_a, column_b = zip(*(line.strip().split() for line in f))

    for a, b in zip(column_a, column_b):
        r = random.sample(column_b, 2)
        while b in r: # resample if we hit a duplicate of the original pair
            r = random.sample(column_b, 2)

        yield a, r[0]
        yield a, r[1]
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I did not notice the should not match given combination. +1. –  sberry Feb 12 '13 at 6:17
    
I have updated the problem. duo to redundancy in second column i have found the cases like pro2 lig1 \npro2 lig1 –  SNA Feb 13 '13 at 9:46
    
This algorithm should work just fine with non-unique values in the second column. It will however weight the values based on how often they appear. That is, a value that appears twice in the original column will probably appear in the output about twice as often as one that appeared only once. If that is undesireable, you can add pop = list(set(column_b)) just before the for loop, then make the random.sample calls take from pop rather than column_b directly. –  Blckknght Feb 13 '13 at 12:47

Say you have two columns:

col1 = ['pro1', 'pro2', ...]
col2 = ['lig1', 'lig2', ...]

Then the most straightforward way to do this would be to use itertools.product and random.sample as below:

from itertools import product
from random import sample

N = 100 #How many pairs to generate

randomPairs = sample(list(product(col1, col2)), N)

If col1 and col2 contain duplicate items, you can extract the unique items by doing set(col1) and set(col2).

Note that list(product(...)) will generate N * M element list, where N and M are the number of unique items in the columns. This may cause problems if N * M ends up being a very large number.

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The only problem I see with this solution is that for really large sizes for col1 and col2 you are creating an awful lot of throw away data using the product call. –  sberry Feb 12 '13 at 6:14
    
@sberry: Yes you're absolutely right. I'm almost tempted to throw an Accept-reject solution in here, as the ratio of throwaways to N will decrease as the number of unique elements grows large :) –  Joel Cornett Feb 12 '13 at 6:19
    
Yes, consume product lazily and apply reservoir sampling to it. –  georg Feb 12 '13 at 8:32
c = """pro1 lig1
pro2 lig2
pro3 lig3
pro4 lig4"""
lines = c.split("\n")
set_a = set()
set_b = set()
for line in lines:
    left, right = line.split(" ")
    set_a |= set([left])
    set_b |= set([right])

import random
for left in sorted(list(set_a)):
    rights = random.sample(set_b, 2)
    for right in rights:
        print left, right

OUTPUT

pro1 lig2
pro1 lig4
pro2 lig4
pro2 lig3
pro3 lig1
pro3 lig4
pro4 lig2
pro4 lig1
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1  
Surely set_a.add(left) is better than set_a |= set([left])? –  Blckknght Feb 12 '13 at 6:17

Using some sorting, filtering, chaining and list comprehensions, you can try:

from itertools import chain
import random
random.seed(12345) # Only for fixing output, remove in productive code

words = [x.split() for x in """pro1 lig1
pro2 lig2
pro3 lig3
pro4 lig4""".split("\n")]

col1 = [w1 for w1,w2 in words]
col2 = [w2 for w1,w2 in words]

col1tocol2 = dict(words)        

combinations = chain(*[
                    [(w1, w2) for w2 in 
                        sorted(
                            filter(
                                lambda x: x != col1tocol2[w1], 
                                col2),
                            key=lambda x: random.random())
                            [:2]]
                    for w1 in col1])

for w1,w2 in combinations:
    print w1, w2

This gives:

pro1 lig3
pro1 lig2
pro2 lig4
pro2 lig1
pro3 lig4
pro3 lig2
pro4 lig3
pro4 lig1

The main trick is to use a random function as key for sorted.

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Wouldn't random.sample be faster than sorting by a random key? I think it uses an O(N) algorithm, rather than O(N log(N)). Another option might be to use heapq.nsmallest with a random key (which should also be O(N), I think). –  Blckknght Feb 13 '13 at 2:07
    
Sure, but sampling twice will no make sure you have each option only once. For large columns, this is definitely not competitive. –  Thorsten Kranz Feb 13 '13 at 8:39
    
I'm not sure if I understand your point. random.sample will return as many items from the population as you request, so there shouldn't be a need to call it twice. –  Blckknght Feb 13 '13 at 12:34
    
Oh, you're right. I didn't notice the second argument. –  Thorsten Kranz Feb 13 '13 at 14:31

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