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I'm having trouble coming up with some tests for a method I want to write.

The method is going to take a hash of some data and create a bunch of associated models with it. The problem is, I'm having a hard time figuring out what the best practice for writing this sort of test is.

For example, the code will:

Take a hash that looks like:

{
  :department => 'CS',
  :course_title => 'Algorithms',
  :section_number => '01B'
  :term => 'Fall 2012',
  :instructor => 'Bob Dylan'
}

And save it to the models Department, Course, Section, and Instructor.

This will take many calls to model.find_or_create, etc.

How could I go about testing each separate purpose of this method, e.g.:

it 'should find or create department' do
  # << Way too many stubs here for each model and all association calls
  dept = mock_model(Department)
  Department.should_receive(:find_or_create).with(:name => 'CS').and_return(dept)
end

Is there a way to avoid the massive amounts of stubs to keep each test FIRST (fast independent repeatable self-checking timely) ? Is there a better way to write this method and/or these tests? I'd really prefer to have short, clean it blocks.

Thank you so much for any help.

Edit: The method will probably look like this:

def handle_course_submission(param_hash)
  department = Department.find_or_create(:name => param_hash[:department])
  course = Course.find_or_create(:title => param_hash[:course_title])
  instructor = Instructor.find_or_create(:name => param_hash[:instructor])
  section = Section.find_or_create(:number => param_hash[:section_number], :term => param_hash[:term])

  # Maybe put this stuff in a different method?
  course.department = department
  section.course = course
  section.instructor = instructor

end

Is there a better way to write the method? How would I write the tests? Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

For passing an array of sections to be created:

class SectionCreator

  # sections is the array of parameters
  def initialize(sections)
    @sections = sections
  end

  # Adding the ! here because I think you should use the save! methods
  # with exceptions as mentioned in one of my myriad comments.
  def create_sections!
    @sections.each do |section|
      create_section!(section)
    end
  end

  def create_section!(section)
    section = find_or_create_section(section[:section_number], section[:term])
    section.add_course!(section_params)
  end

  # The rest of my original example goes here

end

# In your controller or wherever...

def action
  SectionCreator.new(params_array).create_sections!
rescue ActiveRecord::RecordInvalid => ex
  errors = ex.record.errors
  render json: errors
end

Hopefully this covers it all.

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Thanks! Haha I think it finally does. I really appreciate all of your help. We've extremely refactored my code, but I really like this outcome a lot more. –  Ryan Endacott Feb 13 '13 at 6:37
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My first thought is that you may be suffering from a bigger design flaw. Without seeing the greater context of your method it is hard to give much advice. However, in general it is good to break the method up into smaller pieces and follow the single level of abstraction principle.

http://www.markhneedham.com/blog/2009/06/12/coding-single-level-of-abstraction-principle/

Here is something you could try although as mentioned before this is definitely still not ideal:

def handle_course_submission(param_hash)
  department = find_or_create_department(param_hash[:department])
  course = find_or_create_course(param_hash[:course_title])
  # etc.
  # call another method here to perform the actual work
end

private

def find_or_create_department(department)
  Department.find_or_create(name: department)
end

def find_or_create_course(course_title)
  Course.find_or_create(title: course_title)
end

# Etc. 

In the spec...

let(:param_hash) do
  {
    :department => 'CS',
    :course_title => 'Algorithms',
    :section_number => '01B'
    :term => 'Fall 2012',
    :instructor => 'Bob Dylan'
  }
end

describe "#save_hash" do
  before do
    subject.stub(:find_or_create_department).as_null_object
    subject.stub(:find_or_create_course).as_null_object
    # etc.
  end

  after do
    subject.handle_course_submission(param_hash)
  end

  it "should save the department" do
    subject.should_receive(:find_or_create_department).with(param_hash[:department])
  end

  it "should save the course title" do
    subject.should_receive(:find_or_create_course).with(param_hash[:course_title])
  end

  # Etc.

end

describe "#find_or_create_department" do
  it "should find or create a Department" do
    Department.should_receive(:find_or_create).with("Department Name")
    subject.find_or_create_department("Department Name")
  end
end

# etc. for the rest of the find_or_create methods as well as any other
# methods you add

Hope some of that helped a little. If you post more of your example code I may be able to provide less generalized and possibly useful advice.

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Thank you very much for your help! See, that's what I was also considering doing. But is it worth it to have those methods that essentially just call find_or_create with no new functionality of their own? Also, what are :save_department and :save_course_title? –  Ryan Endacott Feb 13 '13 at 2:40
    
Also, will the tests fail if a later portion of handle_course_submission depends on the return course and department? If it associates them, e.g. course.Department = department? Or would it be best to have another method associate_models that does the association? –  Ryan Endacott Feb 13 '13 at 2:43
    
And sorry, one more question. Can you stub each method call in the before block, and then still call should_receive? Thanks again! –  Ryan Endacott Feb 13 '13 at 2:44
    
Sorry for the delayed response. I was leaving work as I was answering the question initially. The save_department and save_course_title expectations were actually typos. I originally wrote out the example code a bit differently and then went through and changed it. I thought I had updated everything but I guess I missed a few spots. I edited it again accordingly. –  Dan Knox Feb 13 '13 at 5:35
    
Thanks! Whenever you have time, would you mind answering the questions in my second comment? I'm just not sure how to implement from here. Do you think those one-liner methods are necessary? –  Ryan Endacott Feb 13 '13 at 5:37
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Given the new context provided, I would split the functionality up amongst your models a little more. Again, this is really just the first thing that comes to mind and could definitely be improved upon. It seems to me like the Section is the root object here. So you could either add a Section.create_course method or wrap it in a service object like so:

Updated this example to use exceptions

class SectionCreator

  def initialize(param_hash)
    number = param_hash.delete(:section_number)
    term = param_hash.delete(:term)

    @section = find_or_create_section(number, term)
    @param_hash = param_hash
  end

  def create!
    @section.add_course!(@param_hash)
  end

  private

  def find_or_create_section(number, term)
    Section.find_or_create(number: number, term: term)
  end

end

class Section < ActiveRecord::Base

  # All of your current model stuff here

  def add_course!(course_info)
    department_name = course_info[:department]
    course_title = course_info[:course_title]
    instructor_name = param_hash[:instructor]

    self.course = find_or_create_course_with_department(course_title, department_name)
    self.instructor = find_or_create_instructor(instructor_name)
    save!

    self
  end

  def find_or_create_course_with_department(course_title, department_name)
    course = find_or_create_course(course_title)
    course.department = find_or_create_department(department_name)
    course.save!
    course
  end

  def find_or_create_course(course_title)
    Course.find_or_create(title: course_title)
  end

  def find_or_create_department(department_name)
    Department.find_or_create(name: department_name)
  end

  def find_or_create_instructor(instructor_name)
    Instructor.find_or_create(name: instructor_name)
  end

end

# In your controller (this needs more work but..)
def create_section_action
  @section = SectionCreator.new(params).create!
rescue ActiveRecord::RecordInvalid => ex
  flash[:alert] = @section.errors
end

Notice how adding the #find_or_create_course_with_department method allowed us to add the association of the department in there while keeping the #add_course method clean. That is why I like to add those methods even though they sometimes seem superflous like in the case of the #find_or_create_instructor method.

The other advantage of breaking out the methods in this fashion is that they become easier to stub in tests as I showed in my first example. You can easily stub all of these methods to make sure the database isn't actually being hit and your tests run fast while at the same time guarantee through the test expectations that the functionality is correct.

Of course, a lot of this comes down to personal preference on how you want to implement it. In this case the service object is probably unnecessary. You could just as easily have implemented that as the Section.create_course method I referenced earlier like so:

class Section < ActiveRecord::Base

  def self.create_course(param_hash)
    section = find_or_create(number: param_hash.delete(:section_number), term: param_hash.delete(:term))
    section.add_course(param_hash)
    section
  end

  # The rest of the model goes here
end

As to your final question, you can definitely stub out methods in RSpec and then apply expectations like should_receive on top of those stubs.

It's getting late so let me know if I missed anything.

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1  
All of this is also depending on the fact that you have your associations correctly. There are also many things you could do with those associations in Rails that would magically reduce the amount of code involved above but I personally prefer explicit, testable methods over Rails magic in most cases. –  Dan Knox Feb 13 '13 at 6:16
1  
I just posted another edit. That service object at the top had a lot of mistakes in the beginning. Sorry for the inconvenience... it is past my bed time. Please just use this as a reference of what is possible and do not take it as gospel. :) –  Dan Knox Feb 13 '13 at 6:20
    
Thanks! I really appreciate it. It's late here as well, so I'll be heading to bed soon. I'll probably implement this tomorrow, and I'll also give you a well-deserved bounty. If I have anymore questions then, I'll comment. I really like the service object implementation idea. –  Ryan Endacott Feb 13 '13 at 6:24
1  
If you are passing an array of the params, then a service object is probably be perfect. I am adding one more answer to reflect that case. –  Dan Knox Feb 13 '13 at 6:26
1  
I'm not sure what you are talking about when you say web crawler/parser but you should really have some other object doing the web crawling/parsing and then when it finally parses out the params it should call the SectionCreator object I have outlined. I really need to go for now. Please mark one of my answers as correct if you have found this helpful. –  Dan Knox Feb 13 '13 at 6:38
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