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How do I create a custom class to loop over consecutive pairs of items in a STL container using a range-based loop?

This is the syntax and output I want:

std::list<int> number_list;
number_list.push_back(1);
number_list.push_back(2);
number_list.push_back(3);

auto paired_list = Paired(number_list);
for (const auto & pair : paired_list) {
  std::printf("The pair is (%d, %d)\n", *(pair[0]), *(pair[1]));
  // or
  //std::printf("The pair is (%d, %d)\n", *(pair.first), *(pair.second));
}
// output:
// The pair is (1, 2)
// The pair is (2, 3)

I know these (and more) are needed, but I can't figure it out:

template <class T>
class Paired {
  ???
  class iterator {
    ???
  }
  iterator begin() {
    ...
  }
  iterator end() {
    ...
  }
}

Don't worry about const modifiers.

No boost.

Do not modify or copy objects in the container.

share|improve this question
2  
If you're willing to use a lambda instead of a range-based loop syntax, you can abuse std::adjacent_find() to do this trivially enough (just return false from the lambda to keep the search going). –  Kevin Ballard Feb 12 '13 at 7:36
    
@Zeta, it's a bit more complicated than that. See the syntax I want to use. –  devtk Feb 12 '13 at 7:51
    
@Kevin, I want range-based syntax, no alternative. Without that requirement, yes it's certainly a trivial exercise and has been done many times. –  devtk Feb 12 '13 at 7:52
7  
Grr, I’m seriously getting allergic to the “no Boost” posts. People, this is an unreasonable restriction. If this is for work, shame your bosses into letting you handle this kind of technical decisions yourselves and make them read this: stackoverflow.com/a/125811/1968 –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 12 '13 at 8:17
9  
Any question with "no boost" has the hidden expectation that the answerers provide some implementation of a part of boost. I don't see the point then: boost is open-source; just go and grab the source yourself. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 12 '13 at 8:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Here's what I would do.

#include <iterator>
#include <utility>

template <typename FwdIt> class adjacent_iterator {
public:
    adjacent_iterator(FwdIt first, FwdIt last)
        : m_first(first), m_next(first == last ? first : std::next(first)) { }

    bool operator!=(const adjacent_iterator& other) const {
        return m_next != other.m_next; // NOT m_first!
    }

    adjacent_iterator& operator++() {
        ++m_first;
        ++m_next;
        return *this;
    }

    typedef typename std::iterator_traits<FwdIt>::reference Ref;
    typedef std::pair<Ref, Ref> Pair;

    Pair operator*() const {
        return Pair(*m_first, *m_next); // NOT std::make_pair()!
    }

private:
    FwdIt m_first;
    FwdIt m_next;
};

template <typename FwdIt> class adjacent_range {
public:
    adjacent_range(FwdIt first, FwdIt last)
        : m_first(first), m_last(last) { }

    adjacent_iterator<FwdIt> begin() const {
        return adjacent_iterator<FwdIt>(m_first, m_last);
    }

    adjacent_iterator<FwdIt> end() const {
        return adjacent_iterator<FwdIt>(m_last, m_last);
    }

private:
    FwdIt m_first;
    FwdIt m_last;
};

template <typename C> auto make_adjacent_range(C& c) -> adjacent_range<decltype(c.begin())> {
    return adjacent_range<decltype(c.begin())>(c.begin(), c.end());
}

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

void test(const vector<int>& v) {
    cout << "[ ";

    for (const auto& p : make_adjacent_range(v)) {
        cout << p.first << "/" << p.second << " ";
    }

    cout << "]" << endl;
}

int main() {
    test({});
    test({11});
    test({22, 33});
    test({44, 55, 66});
    test({10, 20, 30, 40});
}

This prints:

[ ]
[ ]
[ 22/33 ]
[ 44/55 55/66 ]
[ 10/20 20/30 30/40 ]

Notes:

  • I haven't exhaustively tested this, but it respects forward iterators (because it doesn't try to use operations beyond ++, !=, and *).

  • range-for has extremely weak requirements; it doesn't require all of the things that forward iterators are supposed to provide. Therefore I have achieved range-for's requirements but no more.

  • The "NOT m_first" comment is related to how the end of the range is approached. An adjacent_iterator constructed from an empty range has m_first == m_next which is also == last. An adjacent_iterator constructed from a 1-element range has m_first pointing to the element and m_next == last. An adjacent_iterator constructed from a multi-element range has m_first and m_next pointing to consecutive valid elements. As it is incremented, eventually m_first will point to the final element and m_next will be last. What adjacent_range's end() returns is constructed from (m_last, m_last). For a totally empty range, this is physically identical to begin(). For 1+ element ranges, this is not physically identical to a begin() that has been incremented until we don't have a complete pair - such iterators have m_first pointing to the final element. But if we compare iterators based on their m_next, then we get correct semantics.

  • The "NOT std::make_pair()" comment is because make_pair() decays, while we actually want a pair of references. (I could have used decltype, but iterator_traits will tell us the answer too.)

  • The major remaining subtleties would revolve around banning rvalues as inputs to make_adjacent_range (such temporaries would not have their lives prolonged; the Committee is studying this issue), and playing an ADL dance to respect non-member begin/end, as well as built-in arrays. These exercises are left to the reader.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool. I like your idea of keeping m_first and m_next. –  Stas Feb 12 '13 at 9:37
    
@Stephan, thank you for the beautiful solution! And thank you for not changing the question into something easier. I wish you the best in your SO journeys. –  devtk Feb 12 '13 at 11:25
    
"banning rvalues as inputs to make_adjacent_range" - that's not necessary, isn't it? Since the function takes a C&, that can never bind to an rvalue unless you explicitly specify C to be Range const (and if you do that, I'd say you're on your own anyways). Also, nice to see you on SO. :) –  Xeo Feb 12 '13 at 11:40
    
devtk: You're welcome. Xeo: Maintaining the STL has taught me to worry about const rvalues. They're weird, but some things can produce them. –  Stephan T. Lavavej Feb 12 '13 at 21:34
    
In projects that already use Boost, would you consider boost::zip_iterator initialized with adjacent elements as a good alternative for your adjacent_iterator? –  TemplateRex Sep 29 '13 at 13:49

Try this.

#include <list>
#include <iostream>

template<class T, class TIter = typename T::iterator, class TVal = typename T::value_type>
class PairedImpl {
    T& m_t;
public:
    class Iter {
        TIter m_it;
    public:
        Iter(const TIter & it) : m_it(it)  {}

        bool  operator!=(const Iter& it)   {         return m_it != it.m_it; }
        Iter& operator++()                 { ++m_it; return *this; }
        const Iter & operator *() const    {         return *this; }
        const TVal & first()      const    {         return *m_it; }
        const TVal & second()     const    {         return *std::next(m_it); }
    };

    PairedImpl(T& t) : m_t(t) {}

    Iter begin() { return Iter(m_t.begin()); }

    Iter end() {
        TIter end = m_t.end();
        return Iter(m_t.empty() ? end : --end);
    }
};

template<class T>
PairedImpl<T> Paired(T& t) {
    return PairedImpl<T>(t);
}

Usage

int main()
{
    std::list<int> lst;
    lst.push_back(1);
    lst.push_back(2);
    lst.push_back(3);
    lst.push_back(4);
    lst.push_back(5);

    for (const auto & pair : Paired(lst)) {
        std::cout << "(" << pair.first() << ", " << pair.second() << ")" << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think you can add std::forward to the return in Paired and make it even more awesome? –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Feb 12 '13 at 8:49
    
Your use of --end requires bidirectional iterators. –  Stephan T. Lavavej Feb 12 '13 at 9:04
    
@StephanT.Lavavej: Agree. The only idea is to keep m_first and m_next as in your solution. std::next(m_t.begin(), m_t.size() - 1) is slow for lists. –  Stas Feb 12 '13 at 10:09

edit I was using transform.

Use adjacent_difference.

The second version takes a binary function which transforms the two values into a new (different) value:

string make_message(int first, int second) {
    ostringstream oss;
    oss << "The pair is (" << first << ", " << second << ")";
    return oss.str();
}

We can now transform the adjacent pairs into a third range. We'll use the ostream_iterator to use cout like a range:

list<int> numbers;
//...
adjacent_difference(numbers.begin(), numbers.end(),
                    ostream_iterator<string>(cout, "\n"),
                    make_message);

2nd edit

I found a question on comp.lang.c++.moderated asking why there aren't more 'adjacent' functions in the standard library such as for_each_adjacent. The reply said they were trivial to implement using std::mismatch.

I think this would be a better direction to go than implementing a special adjacent iterator.

share|improve this answer
    
You're ignoring the syntax I want. That's absolutely critical to the problem. The whole std::printf thing is for an example usage. –  devtk Feb 12 '13 at 8:05

Okay, an hour with no answers, I've come up with a solution which works. Note that this uses my own FixedLengthVector which is exactly what it sounds like.

template <class T>
class Grouped {
private:
  // length of grouped objects
  static const unsigned length_ = 2;
  // hold pointer to base container to avoid comparing incompatible iterators
  T * base_container_;
public:
  // constructor
  Grouped(T & base_container) :
      base_container_(&base_container) {
  }
  // iterator
  class iterator {
  private:
    // hold pointer to base container to avoid comparing incompatible iterators
    T * base_container_;
    // hold pointers to objects in base container
    FixedLengthVector<length_, typename T::value_type *> ptr_;
    // hold iterator to last object
    typename T::iterator last_iterator_;
  public:
    // constructor
    iterator(T & base_container, typename T::iterator & it)
        : base_container_(&base_container),
          last_iterator_(it) {
      // set up pointers if possible
      unsigned i = 0;
      // check for end iterator
      if (last_iterator_ == base_container_->end()) {
        ptr_.fill(NULL);
        return;
      }
      // set up first object
      ptr_[0] = &*last_iterator_;
      // set up next objects
      for (unsigned i = 1; i < length_; ++i) {
        ++last_iterator_;
        if (last_iterator_ == base_container_->end()) {
          ptr_.fill(NULL);
          return;
        }
        ptr_[i] = &*last_iterator_;
      }
    }
    // dereference operator
    FixedLengthVector<length_, typename T::value_type *> & operator * (void) {
      assert(ptr_[0] != NULL);
      return ptr_;
    }
    // pre-increment
    iterator & operator ++ (void) {
      // can't increase past end
      assert(last_iterator_ != base_container_->end());
      // find next iterator
      ++last_iterator_;
      if (last_iterator_ == base_container_->end()) {
        ptr_.fill(NULL);
        return * this;
      }
      // cycle pointers left
      for (unsigned i = 1; i < length_; ++i) {
        ptr_[i - 1] = ptr_[i];
      }
      ptr_[length_ - 1] = &*last_iterator_;
      return * this;
    }
    // equality comparison
    bool operator == (const iterator & that) const {
      return base_container_ == that.base_container_ &&
             last_iterator_ == that.last_iterator_;
    }
    // inequality comparison
    bool operator != (const iterator & that) const {
      return !(*this == that);
    }
  };
  // end iterator
  iterator end() {
    return iterator(*base_container_, base_container_->end());
  }
  // begin iterator
  iterator begin() {
    return iterator(*base_container_, base_container_->begin());
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this uses my own FixedLengthVector which is exactly what it sounds like. It sounds like a reimplementation of std::array. –  Fiktik Feb 12 '13 at 8:09
1  
It is. But I made it before C++11 was the standard. I guess I can change that in this example since range-based loops require C++11 as well. –  devtk Feb 12 '13 at 8:12

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