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The following piece of java code is highlighted red in Eclipse but it compiles fine. The IDE error is:

Type mismatch, cannot convert from type Optional<Runnable> from Optional<new Runnable>

The compiler should be fine with this from inferred generics but my IDE fails. Is there an incorrect setting somewhere in Eclipse?

Optional<Runnable> o;

o = Optional.of(new Runnable() {
  @Override
  public void run() {

  }
});
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Please comment on what makes this downvote-worthy? –  Kurru Feb 12 '13 at 6:48
    
IntelliJ doesn't have a problem –  Kurru Feb 12 '13 at 6:51
1  
And also the fact that your Question's formatting was mangled to the point of meaninglessness until someone fixed it for you. –  Stephen C Feb 12 '13 at 6:53
    
I would imagine that this is caused because new Runnable() { .. } returns a sub-type of Runnable. Runnable r = new Runnable ..; o = Optional.of(r) should not have a problem. Perhaps differences in compiler language version? –  user166390 Feb 12 '13 at 6:55
    
Thanks for fixing it Stephen, never noticed that my <'s were removed. But I'd hardly call that "mangled to point of meaninglessness" –  Kurru Feb 12 '13 at 6:55

3 Answers 3

This should be:

Optional <Runnable> o;

o = Optional.<Runnable>of (new Runnable () {
    @Override
    public void run () {
        /* your code here */
    }
});
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Shouldnt the generics be infer-able? –  Kurru Feb 12 '13 at 6:48
1  
@Kurru - that depends on your selected Java language level. –  Stephen C Feb 12 '13 at 6:55
    
@StephenC see below, it fails for both 1.6, 1.7. Don't have 1.5 handy. –  na_ka_na Feb 12 '13 at 7:17
    
@Kurru the generic T is inferred, but in the original code it is inferred to the (anonymous) subtype of Runnable. It would be the same case if you created an explicitly named subtype of Runnable, like class MyRunnable implements Runnable { ... }; Optional<Runnable> o = Optional.of(new MyRunnable()). As another example, this situation is analogous to something like List<Number> list = Arrays.asList(Integer.valueOf(1)). So this is actually the correct behavior for Java, regardless of version. –  matts Feb 12 '13 at 15:45

With Java 7 enabled under Eclipse, two lines are necessary to handle your syntax:

Runnable t = new Runnable(){@Override public void run() {/**/}};
Optional< Runnable > o = Optional.of( t );
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As others point out two lines or Optional.<Optional>of() is necessary.

javac (jdk 1.7) fails:

error: incompatible types
  o = Optional.of(new Runnable() {
                 ^
  required: Optional<Runnable>
  found:    Optional<<anonymous Runnable>>
1 error

javac (jdk 1.6) also fails:

incompatible types
found   : Optional<<anonymous java.lang.Runnable>>
required: Optional<java.lang.Runnable>
  o = Optional.of(new Runnable() {
                 ^
1 error

So it seems like this is the defined Java behaviour, don't know why though.

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What does JDK 8 say? :D –  user166390 Feb 13 '13 at 0:36

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