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#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sstream>

class api
{
private:
    void psParser ()
    {
        std::stringstream psOutput;
        psOutput << "ps --no-headers -f -p " << getpid() << " > .txt";

        system (psOutput.str().c_str());

        std::stringstream processInfo;
        processInfo << ":"__FILE__ << ":" << __DATE__ << ":" << __TIME__ << ":";
    }

public:
    static std::stringstream message;
};

namespace sstreamss
{
    std :: stringstream api :: message;
};

int main ()
{
    api::message << "zxzx";

    return 0;
}

Output:

error: definition of ‘api::message’ is not in namespace enclosing ‘api’

I want that static std::stringstream message should be accessible at a global scope, so I want this under a namespace.

What's the way out?

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Put the whole class api in the namespace? –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 12 '13 at 7:18
    
@JoachimPileborg Is that necessary? Can't a member be in a namespace? –  TheIndependentAquarius Feb 12 '13 at 7:23
    
What you are doing is changing the scope of the member, and that is not allowed. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 12 '13 at 7:25
    
Are you sure you want it to be "static"? –  SChepurin Feb 12 '13 at 7:38
    
@SChepurin actually, I want it to work like std::cout. std is a namespace. My variable is a class memeber. I don't want people to start creating objects for accessing it. –  TheIndependentAquarius Feb 12 '13 at 7:45
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I am guessing that you want to have the same instance of api::message accessible across all translation units that have access to api. Unlike plain, non-class static data, which have internal linkage, static class members have external linkage. This means the same instance is seen everywhere. So you do not have to play any games with namespaces. A namespace wouldn't change anything here, but it would have to enclose the whole api class anyway.

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You declared class api in global namespace you can't define member in another namespace. What you need to do is to define api::message in a cpp file

api.h

class api
{
private:
    void psParser ()
    {
        std::stringstream psOutput;
        psOutput << "ps --no-headers -f -p " << getpid() << " > .txt";

        system (psOutput.str().c_str());

        std::stringstream processInfo;
        processInfo << ":"__FILE__ << ":" << __DATE__ << ":" << __TIME__ << ":";
    }

public:
    static std::stringstream message;
};

api.cpp

std::stringstream api::message;

main.cpp

#include "api.h"

int main ()
{
    api::message << "zxzx";

    return 0;
}

But it's not the best practice to make std::stringstream static, you may want to make it a local variable if you could.

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thanks for your post. Got the point. –  TheIndependentAquarius Feb 12 '13 at 8:25
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One way to achieve this is to use singleton design pattern. Define a public static accessor function to access the instance.

class api
{
 private:
 static bool instanceFlag;
 static api* inst;
 ....
  ....
 public:
 static api* getInstance();
 inline void display(std::string msg)
 { 
       std::cout<<msg;
 }
};
bool api::instanceFlag = false;
api* api::inst = NULL;

api* api::getInstance()
{
 if(! instanceFlag)
 {
    inst = new api();
    instanceFlag = true;
    return inst;
 }
 else
 {
    return inst;
 }
}
int main()
{
  // Access the static instance. Same instance available everywhere
  api::getInstance()->display("zxzx");
}
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Your code doesn't compile because you're trying to put api::message into a different namespace from api itself.

I want that static std::stringstream message should be accessible at a global scope

If you want it accessible at the global scope, don't put it in a namespace.

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If you want it accessible at the global scope, don't put it in a namespace. By global I mean in different cpp files. –  TheIndependentAquarius Feb 12 '13 at 7:25
    
@AnishaKaul: How do you expect namespace sstreamss to help with that? –  NPE Feb 12 '13 at 7:30
    
I mean like std::cout works. –  TheIndependentAquarius Feb 12 '13 at 7:31
    
@AnishaKaul std::cout would also work as cout without any namespaces. The namespace really doesn't come into it. –  juanchopanza Feb 12 '13 at 7:43
    
@juanchopanza why? don't we have to use using namespace std; for cout? –  TheIndependentAquarius Feb 12 '13 at 7:45
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