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In Linux, I want to find out all Folder/Sub-folder name and redirect to text file

I tried ls -alR > list.txt, but it gives all files+folders

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closed as off topic by Bart, M42, Bob Kaufman, Justin Ethier, Alfabravo Feb 13 '13 at 15:38

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use find

find . -type d > output.txt

or tree

tree -d > output.txt

tree, If not installed on the system.

sudo apt-get install tree
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In this Option , is there an Option to exclude one single folder... I have a ~snapshot folder in it, which I want to exclude? –  Sandeep540 Feb 12 '13 at 9:57
    
find . -type d -name ~snapshot -prune > output.txt –  Sandeep540 Feb 12 '13 at 10:17
find . -type d > list.txt

Will list all directories and subdirectories under the current path. If you want to list all of the directories under a path other than the current one, change the . to that other path.

If you want to exclude certain directories, you can filter them out with a negative condition:

find . -type d ! -name "~snapshot" > list.txt
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My preference is "du|less" (or "du | cut -f 2|less") ... but your solution is better :) –  paulsm4 Feb 12 '13 at 7:45
    
In this Option , is there an Option to exclude one single folder... I have a ~snapshot folder in it, which I want to exclude? –  Sandeep540 Feb 12 '13 at 9:27
    
@Sandeep540 Sure. find . -type d ! -name "~snapshot" > list.txt –  Amber Feb 13 '13 at 3:27
    
@Amber thanks for the help –  Sandeep540 Feb 13 '13 at 5:43

As well as find listed in other answers, better shells allow both recurvsive globs and filtering of glob matches, so in zsh for example...

ls -lad **/*(/)

...lists all directories while keeping all the "-l" details that you want, which you'd otherwise need to recreate using something like...

find . -type d -exec ls -ld {} \;

(not quite as easy as the other answers suggest)

The benefit of find is that it's more independent of the shell - more portable, even for system() calls from within a C/C++ program etc..

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In this Option , is there an Option to exclude one single folder... I have a ~snapshot folder in it, which I want to exclude? –  Sandeep540 Feb 12 '13 at 9:58
    
@Sandeep50: in zsh, yes: setopt EXTENDED_GLOB, then ls -lad **/*~**/~snapshot(/). Details: from man zshall / "x~y (Requires EXTENDED_GLOB to be set.) Match anything that matches the pattern x but does not match y. [...]". (There's also "^x (Requires EXTENDED_GLOB to be set.) Matches anything except the pattern x. [further explanation of slightly different syntax + example]") –  Tony D Feb 13 '13 at 1:54

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