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I'm looking for a small and simple environment to run small C++ samples. I hate opening visual studio and creating a project just for a single source file with 50 lines of code. The only requirement is to have stl support( smth like this http://www.compileonline.com/compile_cpp_online.php on desktop would be great).

Thanks.

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closed as not constructive by Mahmoud Al-Qudsi, fancyPants, ecatmur, Sean Owen, Yan Sklyarenko Feb 12 '13 at 9:07

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Try IDEONE –  sgar91 Feb 12 '13 at 7:59
    
codeblocks? codeblocks.org –  e19293001 Feb 12 '13 at 8:00
    
For 50 lines of code, why IDE at all? –  Seth Battin Feb 12 '13 at 8:03
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I usually go with a recent version of the gcc compiler, a Makefile, and an editor, such as vim or emacs. –  juanchopanza Feb 12 '13 at 8:03
    
Notepad (plus heavy use of std::cout as an alternative to a debugger). –  Alexey Frunze Feb 12 '13 at 8:09
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

List of C++ IDEs.

List of online C++ compilers.


I'm going to recommend eclipse cdt. Even though creating a project in eclipse cdt is not any faster than Visual Studio, you can always create a project that you can reuse every time for small snippets.

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Desktop IDEs were in question –  David Goshadze Feb 12 '13 at 8:13
    
@DavidGoshadze I noticed, but listing a couple of online ones can't hurt anyone. –  Edward A Feb 12 '13 at 8:14
    
@Edward you can create a project and reuse it in Visual Studio all the same. And it's not blurgh Java. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Feb 12 '13 at 8:24
    
@MahmoudAl-Qudsi Yes, but as of yet VS2012 doesn't fully support C++11. –  Edward A Feb 12 '13 at 8:26
    
Fair point. Though I'd argue enough of it is there.. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Feb 12 '13 at 8:27
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You might want to have a look at this (rather comprehensive) overview. Code::Blocks, CodeLite, Dev-C++ and QtCreator (although, the latter is pretty heavy-weight again) are AFAIK the popular open-source choices.

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Please consider pointing to the following version of Dev-C++, which fixes an immense list of bugs, ships with GCC 4.6.1 (x64) or 4.7.2, and is fully portable: sourceforge.net/projects/orwelldevcpp –  Orwell Feb 12 '13 at 17:53
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One of the oppurtunities you have is Devcpp

You can also take a look at this maintained version of Dev-c++

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Please consider pointing to the following version of Dev-C++, which fixes an immense list of bugs, ships with GCC 4.6.1 (x64) or 4.7.2, and is fully portable: sourceforge.net/projects/orwelldevcpp –  Orwell Feb 12 '13 at 17:53
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SciTE is an editor I used to use. If I remember correctly it has short-cuts for build and run.

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