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I am taking the online course in Coursera "Algorithms: Design and Analysis, Part 1", and just completed the second homework. But during I was doing it, I cannot explain a phenomenon caused by python runtime error.

I am not supposed to distribute the solution code... so I just write some excerpts.

def quick_sort_count (arr, index, median=False):
     # SOME OPERATIONS
     ......
     # Termination
     if len(arr)==0 or len(arr)==1:
         return arr, 0
     ........
     arr[:i-1], t1 = quick_sort_count(arr[:i-1], index, median)
     arr[i:], t2 = quick_sort_count(arr[i:], index, median)
     return arr, len(arr)+t1+t2-1

The program should analyze a data file with 10,000 unique number and calculate how many "comparisons" are there in the quicksort. The question contains three part: using the 1st element as the pivot of comparison; using the last one; and using the "median" one.

The weird part is, I CAN have the correct answer via separately running either of the question. But I CANNOT run all three of them altogether in a function, such as

def main():
    # READING THE FILE
    ......
    _,result1 = quick_sort_count(arr1, 0)
    _,result2 = quick_sort_count(arr2, -1)
    _,result3 = quick_sort_count(arr3, 0, True)

If I did, then there will be a "RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded". Something likes

....
arr[:i-1], t1 = quick_sort_count(arr[:i-1], index, median)
  File "/Users/c/algorithm/quick_sort.py", line 43, in quick_sort_count
arr[:i-1], t1 = quick_sort_count(arr[:i-1], index, median)
  File "/Users/c/algorithm/quick_sort.py", line 43, in quick_sort_count
arr[:i-1], t1 = quick_sort_count(arr[:i-1], index, median)
  File "/Users/c/algorithm/quick_sort.py", line 43, in quick_sort_count
arr[:i-1], t1 = quick_sort_count(arr[:i-1], index, median)
  File "/Users/c/algorithm/quick_sort.py", line 43, in quick_sort_count
arr[:i-1], t1 = quick_sort_count(arr[:i-1], index, median)
  File "/Users/c/algorithm/quick_sort.py", line 33, in quick_sort_count
arr = swap(arr, index, 0)
RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded

The "swap" is just a simple operation that changes the locations of arr[index] and arr[0], which is the requirement from the 2nd question--"use the final element as pivot element and swap it to the first element before sorting".

And if I further increase the recursion limit via

import sys
sys.setrecursionlimit(100000)

Then the 2nd and 3rd question will have wrong answers.

Can someone tell me why does this happen? Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
    
Could you come up with a minimal complete example that demonstrates this? It sounds like you're inadvertently keeping state somewhere, but it's hard to be sure with just the information you've given us so far. –  NPE Feb 12 '13 at 9:10
    
This happens because of a bug in your quicksort algorithm. You need to properly define the recursion termination condition. Since you did not show that part in you excerpt I can't tell what's wrong. –  Ber Feb 12 '13 at 9:11
    
@Ber, I add the termination in the code. It just returns when there is no elements or only one in the list. –  Chris.Q Feb 12 '13 at 9:24
    
@NPE I add some messages from terminal when I run the program. Does that help to clarify something...? –  Chris.Q Feb 12 '13 at 9:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As you haven't posted the complete code, here's a bit of general advice on how to overcome python's recursion limit.

A generic recursive function has the following structure:

def foo:
    if termination-condition
        return value
    else
        new-value = some-calculations
        return foo(new-value)

The first step is to make your function tail-recursive, that is, eliminate the calculations in the else branch and bring it to the form

def foo:
    if termination-condition
        return value
    else
        return foo(some-calculations)

In a language that supports tail-recursion optimization that would be enough, in python you have to go one step further. Instead of making an immediate recursive call return foo(...), let's return a "thunk", which is basically a description or a promise of what you intend to do. In python, a thunk can be written as an anonymous lambda function:

def foo:
    if termination-condition
        return value
    else
        return lambda: foo(some-calculations)

Of course, you'll need another intermediate function that would consume values returned from foo and if a thunk is given, carries it out until a terminal (non-function) value is returned:

def foo-interface:
    # get a thunk or a terminal
    t = foo()  
    # while it's a thunk...
    while callable(t):
        t = t() # ...carry it out
    # return the terminal
    return t

Example

Let's have the following naive implementation of factorial, which fails on large arguments:

def fac(n):
    return 1 if n < 2 else n * fac(n - 1)

> fac(3000)
> RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded

Convert it to tail-recursive...

def f(n, acc=1):
    return acc if n < 2 else f(n - 1, acc * n)

...apply the thunk transformation...

def f(n, acc):
    return acc if n < 2 else lambda: f(n - 1, acc * n)

...and wrap it in an interface function (consumer)...

def fac(n):

    def f(n, acc):
        return acc if n < 2 else lambda: f(n - 1, acc * n)

    t = f(n, 1)
    while callable(t):
        t = t()
    return t

It works!

> fac(3000)
> 41493596034....

This technique is called "trampolining". Don't know if this is helpful in your particular case (hence CW), but I guess this is something good to know about (and to impress your prof, by chance)).

Decorator

This kind of tail recursion can be written as a decorator. A nice explanation using classes instead of lambda is given here.

share|improve this answer
    
As quitsort has two recursion at each level it cannot be converted to tail recursion. –  Ber Feb 12 '13 at 9:50
    
The trampoline can be written as a function decorator, and reused for all tail recursive functions. –  Ber Feb 12 '13 at 9:51
    
@Ber: thanks for your comments, as this post is CW, feel free to improve it. –  gdbdmdb Feb 12 '13 at 9:53
    
Thanks @thg435 :) Though the answer is not specific for my question, it does give me some insights about how to manage recursive calls in python. –  Chris.Q Feb 13 '13 at 0:50
    
Thanks @Ber! I appreciate the help. –  Chris.Q Feb 13 '13 at 0:51

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